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December 14th, 2007
04:50 PM ET

North Korea responds to President Bush?

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FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Maybe President Bush should have turned Saddam Hussein into a pen pal. It looks like his recent letter to North Korea's Kim Jong Il might have been a strike of diplomacy.

In that letter, addressed to "Mr. Chairman", the president said a "critical juncture" had been reached in the 6-party talks aimed at denuclearizing the Korean peninsula. He urged Pyongyang to follow through on the agreement and to declare and dismantle its nuclear weapons program.

Well, North Korea came back with a verbal response today to Mr. Bush's letter. They said they appreciated the president's message, and that they plan to hold up their end of the bargain and expect the U.S. to do the same.

The president told reporters quote "I got his attention with a letter and he can get my attention by fully disclosing his programs."

North Korea started disabling its plutonium-producing reactor last month. In exchange, the U.S. agreed to move towards normalizing relations with North Korea, and removing the country from terrorism and trade sanctions black lists.

Here’s my question to you: Does anything change because North Korea responded to President Bush’s letter to Kim Jong Il?

Interested to know which ones made it on air:

FULL POST


Filed under: Uncategorized
December 14th, 2007
04:49 PM ET

A mistake to nominate Huckabee?

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FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Mike Huckabee is the Howard Dean of the 2008 presidential race.

That's according to a piece by Rich Lowry in the National Review. He suggests Republicans would be making a major mistake by nominating Huckabee.

Lowry writes, “Like Dean, Huckabee is an under-vetted former governor who is manifestly unprepared to be president of the United States. Like Dean, he is rising toward the top of the polls in a crowded field based on his appeal to a particular niche of his party. As with Dean, his vulnerabilities in a general election are so screamingly obvious that it's hard to believe that primary voters, once they focus seriously on their choice, will nominate him."

It's worth noting that Lowry's employer, The National Review, has endorsed Mitt Romney, one of Huckabee's main opponents.

Lowry goes on to say that Huckabee would take religion, a strength of the GOP, and make it into a weakness by overplaying it. He suggests other vulnerabilities would be Huckabee's tax history as governor of Arkansas along with his lack of national security experience. In fact, Lowry says Democrats have to be looking at Huckabee "as a shiny Christmas present that is too good to be true."

Here’s my question to you: Would Republicans be making a mistake by nominating Mike Huckabee for president?

To see the Cafferty File video, click here 

Interested to know which ones made it on air:

FULL POST


Filed under: Democrats • Elections • Mike Huckabee
December 14th, 2007
02:32 PM ET

Taxing the rich?

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FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Democratic presidential contenders are calling for higher taxes on the richest Americans and on big corporations.

At yesterday's debate, Hillary Clinton said she wants to keep the "middle class tax cuts" that Congress passed under President Bush, but favors raising taxes for the wealthiest.

John Edwards agreed, saying that our tax policy "Has been established by the big corporations and the wealthiest Americans." He says the U.S. should get rid of those tax breaks.

And Barack Obama weighed in saying, "We need to put those tax breaks and tax loopholes back into the pockets of hardworking Americans."

The Democrats also agreed that the idea of balancing the federal budget would have to wait, with Obama saying we won't be able "to dig ourselves out" of the Bush era deficits in the next year or two. Only Bill Richardson said balancing the budget would be a high priority, noting that as New Mexico governor, that's what he's required to do.

All this, of course a far cry from what we heard from the Republican candidates the day before. They called repeatedly for the elimination of the estate tax and reduction in the income tax on corporations.

Here’s my question to you: Is calling for higher taxes on the rich a good strategy for the Democratic presidential candidates?

FULL POST


Filed under: Democrats • Elections • Taxes