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December 13th, 2007
04:40 PM ET

Major candidates saying “I’m sorry”?

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FROM Jack Cafferty:

"I'm sorry.” That's the message coming from a couple of the top contenders for the White House.

Instead of the public learning more about who might be best-qualified to run this country, we're being confronted with the aftermath of scurrilous personal attacks.

First it was a comment about Mitt Romney's religion. Mike Huckabee says he personally apologized to Romney, after asking a reporter whether Mormons believe Jesus and Satan are brothers. Huckabee, who had come under fire for the comment, says he told Romney after yesterday's debate he would never try "to pick out some point of your faith and make it an issue."

Less than 24 hours later, over on the Democratic side, we had a top Hillary Clinton advisor launching an attack against Barack Obama. Bill Shaheen said Democrats should give more thought to Obama's illegal drug use when he was a kid before deciding if he deserves the nomination. Shaheen later apologized and said his comments weren't authorized by the Clinton campaign. Late this afternoon, Shaheen quit the Clinton campaign.

But his comments were nasty enough to warrant a personal apology today from Hillary Clinton herself. Apparently Clinton told Obama she was very upset by the remarks, that she told Shaheen it was unacceptable and that this isn't "the kind of campaign" she's running.

It certainly is getting ugly out there.

Here’s my question to you: What does it say about the nature of this presidential campaign when major candidates are being forced to say “I’m sorry”?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Democrats • Elections • Mike Huckabee
December 13th, 2007
04:37 PM ET

Rate the Democratic-led Congress?

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FROM Jack Cafferty:

What a year it's been. Here we are, a little more than a week to go before the Democratic-led Congress adjourns and they don't have a heck of a lot to show for themselves.

First, House Democratic leaders caved into President Bush's spending limit on a massive domestic spending bill. Although they're vowing to shift funds away from the president's priorities to theirs, it still signals a big political victory for the White House.

Next, what started out as an ambitious agenda a year ago has now been reduced to finger pointing between House and Senate Democrats.

The Washington Post reports Congressman Charlie Rangel is accusing Senate Democratic leaders of developing "Stockholm syndrome" - that they're showing sympathy to their Republican captors and giving in on all sorts of legislation. He suggests if Republicans want to filibuster a bill, that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid should keep the bill on the floor and make Republicans talk it to death.

For his part, Reid says he "can't control Speaker Pelosi", that she's a strong, independent woman who "runs the House with an iron hand."

And, in case that's not enough, there's a possibility the government could actually shut down if some of this stuff isn't resolved. It's no wonder so few Americans approve of the job they're doing.

Here’s my question to you: One year later, how would you rate the performance of the Democratic-led Congress?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Congress • Democrats
December 13th, 2007
12:37 PM ET

Steroid scandal damaging baseball?

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FROM Jack Cafferty:

Roger Kahn dubbed them "The Boys of Summer" in one of the finest books ever written about American sports.

Baseball has long been the great escape in America. An afternoon at any major league park watching wholesome, fresh-faced young kids playing a truly great game at its highest level provided the perfect escape from the tedium of the job, the drudgery of the commute, the tensions of the marriage and the problems with the children.

A hot dog, a cold drink and the cry of "play ball," was always a lot better and a lot cheaper than spending an hour on some shrink's couch.

But they had to go and ruin it for us.

When Mark McGwire, with a neck the size of a tree trunk, was shattering home run records and waving his bat around at home plate like a toothpick, we should have known something was up. And it was.

Now comes the depressing news that a bunch of our heroes were jerking us around and have been linked in a 20-month investigation to performance-enhancing drugs: Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, Lenny Dykstra, Andy Pettitte, Mo Vaughn, Gary Sheffield... It's a long list, with dozens of names on it, according to George Mitchell's investigation.

This is a betrayal on a massive scale. The behavior is every bit as criminal as any politician who betrays the public trust. We came to watch you guys play baseball and you've let us down.

Here’s my question to you: How much damage will a massive steroid scandal ultimately do to Major League Baseball?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Uncategorized