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November 4th, 2009
06:00 PM ET

Palin, Beck, Limbaugh fail in N.Y. congressional race

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The Democrats took a beating in the New Jersey and Virginia governors' races... but the far right got their clocks cleaned in that congressional race in upstate New York.

Florida Governor Charlie Crist has been accused of being Republican in Name Only (RINO).

Florida Governor Charlie Crist has been accused of being Republican in Name Only (RINO).

In defeating Conservative Doug Hoffman, Bill Owens will be the first Democrat to represent Congressional District 23 since the Civil War. Hoffman was aggressively supported by a bunch of the right wing's loudest voices - Sarah Palin, Glenn Beck and Rush Limbaugh.

They tried to make this race a symbol of how the Republican Party has strayed from its conservative values. Pressure from the right-wing of the party helped push the Republican candidate out of the race last week - because she just wasn't Republican enough. Some even saw this contest as a struggle for the soul of the GOP. At least the results don't suggest Sarah Palin won that fight.

Nevertheless, it seems like conservative activists are just warming up. They have their eyes on a list of so-called RINOs - or Republicans in Name Only - for the midterm elections, people like Florida's Republican Governor, Charlie Crist, who's running for the Senate.

And some warn that Sarah Palin could be entering dangerous territory if she leads the movement against well-established figures like Crist. After all - Florida is often a key state in the presidential election. And, there's the issue of Palin's ability to control a group of activists once they're fired up. You could make the argument Palin entered dangerous territory when she left City Hall in Wasilla.

Here’s my question to you: What does it say that the likes of Sarah Palin, Glenn Beck and Rush Limbaugh failed to get their candidate elected in the N.Y. congressional race?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Rush Limbaugh • Sarah Palin
September 16th, 2009
04:00 PM ET

Does racism have anything to do with opposition to Pres. Obama?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Former President Jimmy Carter says racism plays a major role in the recent opposition to President Obama. Carter says part of this "intensely demonstrated animosity" is based on the fact that the president is black.

Former President Carter tells "NBC Nightly News" that racism has surfaced in opposition to President Obama.

Carter says that racism is bubbling up among many white people all around the country because they think African-Americans aren't qualified to lead. he calls it "an abominable circumstance."

The former president also says racism was at play in the recent outburst by Republican Congressman Joe Wilson of South Carolina, who called President Obama a liar. Some say a white president would never be treated this way.

But critics say all this is nonsense. The head of the Republican National Committee, Michael Steele says President Carter is "flat-out wrong." Steele, who is black, says the opposition isn't about race, but rather about policy. He calls these charges of racism a distraction by Democrats to shift the debate away from health care reform.

Then there's Rush Limbaugh - he talks about how race rules all in what he calls "Obama's America." The right wing radio host suggests that race is at play in nearly every aspect of society today... including the story of the white kid who got beat up on an Illinois bus by black students.

Limbaugh also says racism is behind the media's treatment of Kanye West after his stunt at the video music awards, which Limbaugh considered relatively mild behavior.

Here’s my question to you: Does racism have anything to do with the opposition to President Obama?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST

June 4th, 2009
05:00 PM ET

Why did Gingrich and Limbaugh change their tune about Sotomayor?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Newt Gingrich and Rush Limbaugh - the Abbott and Costello of the Republican party - are dialing down their rhetoric when it comes to Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor. Gingrich - who just a week ago called on the "Latina woman racist" to withdraw - is taking it back.

Cafferty: The kind stuff Gingrich and Limbaugh say doesn't make them very popular.

He now says his initial reaction to the judge's comments was "perhaps too strong and direct." Really... ? He says he shouldn't have used the word "racist" to refer to Sotomayor as a person - even if her words were unacceptable.

The other gas bag, Limbaugh, says he doesn't know why Gingrich retracted his comment. The radio host still believes Sotomayor would "bring a form of racism and bigotry" to the court. But Limbaugh says he may look past that and is now open to supporting President Obama's nominee if he can be convinced that she has a "sensibility toward life in a legal sense." He's talking about abortion here. What a guy.

Kind of makes you wonder who in the Republican party got to these guys. Senator Jeff Sessions - who had condemned the hateful talk - is praising Gingrich's decision to back off his "racist" comment.

Meanwhile it's clear that the kind stuff Gingrich and Limbaugh say doesn't make them very popular. A recent CNN/Opinion Research Corporation Poll shows Gingrich with a favorable rating of 36-percent, and Limbaugh at a measly 30-percent. When you compare that to Colin Powell - who gets a favorable rating of 70 percent - there's little question about which direction the Republican Party should be headed.

Here’s my question to you: What caused Newt Gingrich and Rush Limbaugh to change their tune when it comes to Sonia Sotomayor?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Newt Gingrich • Rush Limbaugh • Sonia Sotomayor
May 28th, 2009
05:00 PM ET

Does it hurt GOP when right-wing critics call Sotomayor a racist?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The national dialogue just doesn't seem to get any gentler. Right-wing conservatives like Newt Gingrich and Rush Limbaugh are now out calling Judge Sonia Sotomayor a "racist."

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is among several prominent Republicans who have called Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor a 'racist.'

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is among several prominent Republicans who have called Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor a 'racist.'

They are pointing to comments that the Supreme Court nominee made in 2001, when she said, "a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experience would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life.".

Gingrich goes so far as to say that a white racist male nominee would be forced to withdraw and so, too, should a racist Latina.

The White House is pushing back, saying it's important for anyone in this debate to be "exceedingly careful" in how they describe different aspects of the confirmation process. And Hispanic leaders warn that critics risk alienating Latinos if they appear to be judging Sotomayor before she can even defend herself; nominees traditionally don't say anything publicly ahead of their confirmation hearings.

As Ed Rollins writes on CNN.com, the battle for the heart and soul of the Republican Party has now spilled over into this Supreme Court confirmation debate. He says critics who have been unable to attack President Obama think they can smear him with his court pick. But Rollins says there can be no debate over Sotomayor's qualifications, and warns Republicans that this confirmation "is not the battle to be waged and it won't be won."

Here’s my question to you: Does it hurt the GOP when Newt Gingrich and Rush Limbaugh call Judge Sonia Sotomayor a "racist"?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Newt Gingrich • Rush Limbaugh • Sonia Sotomayor
May 26th, 2009
06:00 PM ET

Who would Republicans be better off listening to?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The Republicans making the most noise seem to be attracting the fewest followers. According to a CNN opinion research corporation poll 70% of Americans favor former Secretary of State Colin Powell while 30% favor right-wing talk show host Rush Limbaugh. Let's factor in a previous CNN poll which found 37% of Americans favoring former Vice President Dick Cheney, who has had no loss for words lately. After being virtually silent for eight years he can't, or won't stop talking.

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If you narrow it down further and look at the responses of only Republicans, 66% favor Cheney, 64% favor Powell and 62% favor Limbaugh.

At a time when the GOP is trying to rid itself of the legacy of the Bush administration, two former government leaders and a talk show host are the ones making headlines, and two out of three for the wrong reasons.

These three have been butting heads lately. Powell has said Republicans need to stop listening to Limbaugh while Cheney and Limbaugh have proclaimed that Powell is no longer a Republican, which Powell has denied.

Here’s my question to you: Who would Republicans be better off listening to Colin Powell, Rush Limbaugh, or Dick Cheney?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Colin Powell • Dick Cheney • Rush Limbaugh
May 5th, 2009
05:39 PM ET

Limbaugh: Palin most "prominent and articulate voice" for conservatism

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

As the Republican Party continues to struggle, some of them are starting to sound silly. Rush Limbaugh is now suggesting that Sarah Palin is the most prominent and articulate voice for good old-fashioned American conservatism. Recalling the disastrous interviews Ms. Palin did with Katie Couric on the CBS Evening News during the campaign, 'prominent' and 'articulate' are not the words that immediately pop into my mind.

But the leader of the Republican Party, Rush Limbaugh, thinks differently...

Limbaugh also insists that some Republican leaders hate, despise and fear Sara Palin as well as find her embarrassing. The embarrassing part I definitely understand.

He's referring to that new group formed by old Republicans called the National Council for a New America. It's made up of folks like Jeb Bush, Mitt Romney, Bobby Jindal and John McCain who are working to re-brand the GOP.

Limbaugh says it's nothing more than an early campaign event being held by a bunch of Republicans who have what Limbaugh calls "presidential perspirations." While some members of this Council for a New America are calling for doing away with the Reagan era and finding a more forward looking message, Limbaugh says a lot of that talk is code meant as a knock on Sarah Palin who is conspicuously absent from the National Council for a New America.

Well don't you know, once again Limbaugh speaks and Republicans snap to attention and salute. No sooner had he said all this stuff than Congressman Eric Cantor announced that Palin had finally accepted an offer to join the National Council for a New America. Go figure.

Here’s my question to you: Rush Limbaugh says Sarah Palin is the most "prominent and articulate voice" for conservatism. Is he right?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Republicans • Rush Limbaugh • Sarah Palin
December 12th, 2008
01:02 PM ET

Should Republicans stop listening to Rush Limbaugh?

Here’s my question to you: Should Republicans stop listening to Rush Limbaugh?

Tune in to the Situation Room at 6pm to see if Jack reads your answer on the air.

And we love to know where you’re writing from, so please include your city and state with your comment


Filed under: Rush Limbaugh