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Was the Arab Spring worth it?
FILE PHOTO: Protesters carrying a giant Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square during a mass rally on November 25, 2011 in Cairo.
September 12th, 2012
04:00 PM ET

Was the Arab Spring worth it?

By CNN's Jack Cafferty:

So much for the Arab Spring.

The wave of protests that swept parts of the Middle East and North Africa - in which the people fought to oust dictators - doesn't seem to have brought many of them any closer to a peaceful society.

Libya and Egypt are but the latest examples.

Years from now Historians might even trace the origin of the arab spring to the decision of George W. Bush to attack Iraq in the wake of 9/11:

Go in, overthrow a dictator, turn the country over to the people and nirvana will surely follow.

But violence continues in Iraq and people die there every day.

Egypt's now in the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood. Mubarak is gone, they had elections and yesterday violent mobs assaulted the U.S. Embassy compound.

In Libya, Moammar Gadhafi is gone and the U.S. Ambassador and three other people are dead. Because some terrorists in that country didn't like a movie that was critical of Islam.

Syria's become a slaughterhouse with the dictator Assad hanging on and murdering the civilian population at will.

Iran continues its march toward nuclear weapons - I don't even want to think what might happen if they get them.

And al Qaeda is busy reconstituting itself in Pakistan and half a dozen other countries.

The songwriter who wrote the lyrics "Wishing won't make it so" was spot on.

And anybody who thinks the Middle East is going to suddenly transform itself into a peaceful civilization where the majority rules hasn't been reading the history books.

Here’s my question to you: Was the Arab Spring worth it?

Tune in to the Situation Room at 4pm to see if Jack reads your answer on air.

And, we love to know where you’re writing from, so please include your city and state with your comment.

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Filed under: Egypt • Libya • Middle East
How will the meltdown in the Middle East affect the U.S. presidential election?
A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the U.S. consulate compound in Benghazi last night.
September 12th, 2012
03:55 PM ET

How will the meltdown in the Middle East affect the U.S. presidential election?

By CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The violence in Libya has suddenly yanked the spotlight off the economy and put it squarely on foreign policy as far as the U.S. presidential campaign is concerned.

Mitt Romney is slamming President Obama for his administration's response to angry mobs attacking U.S. diplomatic buildings in the Middle East.

Romney said that a statement from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo was like an apology, calling it "disgraceful to apologize for American values." Other Republicans are jumping in, blasting the president's "failed foreign policy of appeasement and apology."

The White House has disavowed the embassy statement, saying it did not approve the statement. In it, the Cairo embassy condemned "continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims." This all goes back to a film produced in the United States that some Muslims found offensive.

Meanwhile the president condemned the attacks and said we must "unequivocally oppose the kind of senseless violence" that took the lives of four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya.

The president's campaign said Romney is using the tragic events for political gain.

Others agree that Romney may have jumped the gun with his response.

Sen. John Kerry called Romney's remarks irresponsible, inexperienced and reckless. He said Romney was wrong to weigh in before all the facts are known.

As for voters, they tend to trust the president more on foreign policy. A CNN/ORC International Poll released this week showed President Barack Obama with a 54%-42% advantage over Romney.

Here’s my question to you: How will the meltdown in the Middle East affect the U.S. presidential election?

Tune in to the Situation Room at 5pm to see if Jack reads your answer on air.

And, we love to know where you’re writing from, so please include your city and state with your comment.

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Filed under: 2012 Election • Egypt • Libya • Middle East