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Is the Internet making us crazy?
July 9th, 2012
04:00 PM ET

Is the Internet making us crazy?

By CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Put down that iPhone or BlackBerry. Look up from your computer screen or video game and stop texting, e-mailing and chatting online. It turns out the Internet could be driving us crazy.

Newsweek magazine has a fascinating report on a growing body of worldwide research that shows just how much this technology might be damaging us.

Researchers find that the Internet might be making us more depressed, anxious, stressed, suicidal and prone to obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit disorders. The brains of Internet addicts even look like those of drug and alcohol addicts.

The statistics are staggering: Americans spend at least eight hours a day staring at a screen. That's more time than we spend doing anything else, including sleeping.

Teens fit seven hours of screen time into the average school day. It goes to 11 hours if you include the time they're multitasking on several devices. And more than one-third of smartphone users get online before they get out of bed.

Meanwhile, the average person sends or receives about 400 text messages a month. For teens, that number jumps to 3,700.

Time online often replaces sleep, exercise and face-to-face contact with real, live people.
These are just some of the reasons why China, Taiwan and South Korea have started treating problematic Internet use like a national health crisis.

It's no wonder experts are alarmed as they describe the computer as "electronic cocaine" that fuels cycles of mania followed by depression, and they say the Internet "encourages – and even promotes - insanity."

Here’s my question to you: Is the Internet making us crazy?

Tune in to the Situation Room at 4pm to see if Jack reads your answer on air.

And, we love to know where you’re writing from, so please include your city and state with your comment.

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Whom do you trust more to turn around the economy: President Obama or Mitt Romney?
July 9th, 2012
03:55 PM ET

Whom do you trust more to turn around the economy: President Obama or Mitt Romney?

By CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Mitt Romney is coming under fire from some conservatives when it comes to the economy.

Bill Kristol of the Weekly Standard says that Romney won't be able to win in November if voters don't think he has a clear plan to fix the economy.

Radio host Laura Ingraham also took a swipe at Romney - wondering why he's taking vacation when "we have a country to save."

The Wall Street Journal, now owned by Rupert Murdoch, says Romney needs to get more specific about how he would do a better job than Obama:

"The Romney campaign thinks it can play it safe and coast to the White House by saying the economy stinks and it's Mr. Obama's fault."

In fairness to Mr. Romney some of this griping is coming from conservative quarters that weren't thrilled with him in the first place.

Romney has a plan for jobs and economic growth laid out on his website.

And the likely Republican nominee has talked about how he would do things like lower tax rates, lift the barriers to the Keystone Pipeline, curb some regulatory policies that he says have driven up energy costs and repeal Obamacare.

Meanwhile what about President Obama? With another grim jobs report for June, unemployment is stuck at over 8% and job growth is weak.

If unemployment stays where it is - or goes higher - before November, it might be tough for the president to convince millions of unemployed Americans that he can feel their economic pain. Plus the national debt and annual deficits are out of control on his watch.

A recent CNN/ORC poll shows Americans just about split down the middle when it comes to who would better handle the economy.

Here’s my question to you: Whom do you trust more to turn around the economy: President Obama or Mitt Romney?

Tune in to the Situation Room at 5pm to see if Jack reads your answer on air.

And, we love to know where you’re writing from, so please include your city and state with your comment.

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Filed under: 2012 Election • Economy • Mitt Romney