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July 13th, 2011
05:00 PM ET

What does it mean that 42 percent of Americans don't want Congress to raise the debt ceiling?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Despite that nasty game of chicken going on in Washington over raising the debt ceiling, congressional leaders from both parties have agreed that doing it is necessary.

National debt exceeds $14.3 trillion as the government faces an August 2 deadline to get congressional leaders to agree to a deal.

National debt exceeds $14.3 trillion as the government faces an August 2 deadline to get congressional leaders to agree to a deal.

The argument is over what else goes into a such bill that's tying them up and bringing us dangerously close to defaulting on some of our loans.

But according to a new Gallup poll, 42% of Americans don't want the debt ceiling raised and want their members of Congress to vote against any measure that raises it. Only 22 percent want their lawmakers to vote for raising the debt ceiling. One third of Americans say they are unsure.

When asked which is a greater concern, 51% say raising the debt ceiling without plans for major spending cuts worries them more. Only about 1/3 say they are more concerned with the risk of a major economic crisis if Congress does not take action.

But there are two separate issues here. Republican lawmakers have tied voting to raise the debt ceiling to long term deficit reduction. The fact is, if we don't raise the ceiling by August 2 and the U.S. defaults on some of its loans... interest rates would shoot up, the dollar would plummet, stock markets around the world would tumble. If you think things are ugly now, they could get much uglier.

In a separate poll, the number of Americans who believe the country is on the wrong track rose to 63% this month, up three percentage points from June. And if the United States fails to pay its creditors, it's a good bet that number will go even higher.

Here’s my question to you: What does it mean that 42 percent of Americans don't want Congress to raise the debt ceiling?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Congress • National debt
July 13th, 2011
04:56 PM ET

A restaurant in Pennsylvania has banned children under the age of six. Is that fair?

ALT TEXT

(PHOTO CREDIT: THINKSTOCK)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

A restaurant in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, just outside Pittsburgh, is banning children younger than 6 from its dining room.

The owner of McDain's says he decided to change his restaurant's policy after older customers complained about noise and unruly behavior by children dining with parents who do little to control their kids. The policy goes into effect Saturday. If the place was closer, I would make a reservation today.

McDain's is a small restaurant - it seats about 40 people, and it sits on a quiet golf course. Not exactly Chuck E. Cheese. But nonetheless the decision to ban the little noisemakers has caused an uproar in town.

This isn't the first time a restaurant has gotten fed up with tiny diners who can't sit quietly through a meal.

Last year, a restaurant called The Olde Salty in Carolina Beach, North Carolina, ruffled some feathers after a sign saying "Screaming Children Will Not Be Tolerated!" was posted in its window. And it was magic. While some locals were up in arms about it, that restaurant owner has reported a boom in business. She says diners who are looking for a peaceful meal now seek out her restaurant.

Of course badly behaved kids are not just a problem in restaurants.

Malaysia Airlines recently announced that it's banning infants from first class because of complaints received from passengers about crying babies on long flights. Other airlines catering mainly to business travelers have also been pressured to consider child-free sections of their flights and even child-free planes. We'll see what happens. Airlines need paying customers to fill seats, and kids, poorly behaved or otherwise, are part of that equation.

Here’s my question to you: A restaurant in Pennsylvania has banned children under the age of six. Is that fair?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Children • On Jack's radar