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October 6th, 2010
05:41 PM ET

Bar people from protesting at funerals?

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Protesters demonstrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court while justices hear oral arguments in the First Amendment case of Snyder v. Phelps. (PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The Supreme Court is deciding a case involving the disgusting behavior of protesting at funerals.

The case focuses on a Baptist Church from Kansas whose anti-gay protests have targeted the funerals of soldiers who died in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The church claims the soldiers' deaths are God's revenge for the United States tolerating homosexuality. Members of this church have traveled around the country, showing up at funerals and shouting at grieving family members.

They also display signs with messages like, "Thank God for dead soldiers," "God blew up the troops" and "AIDS cures fags."

The Snyder family sued the church in 2007 after protests at their son's funeral. Their suit claims invasion of privacy and the intentional infliction of emotional distress. A jury awarded them more than $10 million, but that amount was cut in half by a judge and then overturned by an appeals court.

The judges said although the church's message was offensive, the speech was protected.

The soldier's father, Albert Snyder, said his son was not gay and the protesters shouldn't have been at his funeral, calling their actions "inhuman."

The attorneys general of 48 states and the District of Columbia, along with a bipartisan group of 40 senators, support the Snyders. So does common sense.

The church insists it has the right to protest at funerals. It is backed by First Amendment and media groups, which denounce the church's message but defend its free speech rights.

The Supreme Court's decision in this case isn't expected for months.

Here’s my question to you: Should people be barred from protesting at funerals?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Afghanistan • U.S. Army • War in Iraq
October 6th, 2010
05:00 PM ET

Would promise to undo health care get you to vote for a Republican?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Much like the Democrats themselves, President Obama's signature issue of health care reform might get quite a beating in the midterm elections.

For starters, three states will vote on proposed constitutional amendments that would let them opt out of key provisions in the health care law.

Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma are all hoping to follow the lead of Missouri - which has already passed a similar initiative with a whopping 71 percent of the vote.

The idea of these measures is to ban the federal government from forcing people to buy health insurance.

Supporters say it's unconstitutional. Whether it is or not, there is a lot of opposition to this law which was cobbled together out of public view, contains no public option, and so far hasn't done a single thing to bring down health care costs.

A lot of Republicans are latching on to the discontent over this issue; pledging to repeal the health care law if they win control of Congress.

Democrats who voted against the bill are also making sure their constituents know it, and a lot of those who voted for the bill are keeping quiet.

It's unlikely Republicans will be able to repeal the measure while President Obama is still in office. And it's unclear if moderate Republicans and Independents will support efforts to undo the law.

A recent CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll shows 47 percent of those surveyed want Congress to repeal and replace the health care law; and fewer than one in five think the law will personally help them or their families.

Here’s my question to you: Would a promise to undo health care reform be enough to get you to vote for a Republican?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Election Process • Elections • GOP • Health care • Republican Party • Republicans