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June 11th, 2010
06:00 PM ET

Why has U.S. politics lost any semblance of dignity?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

It's no wonder the American public is disgusted with Washington and politicians of all stripes.

Our lawmakers sound more like children messing around on the playground than the people meant to represent us and solve the nation's problems.

In an open mic gaffe, Carly Fiorina was caught on camera referring to Barbara Boxer’s hair as 'so yesterday.'

In an open mic gaffe, Carly Fiorina was caught on camera referring to Barbara Boxer’s hair as 'so yesterday.'

And that starts right at the top.

This week, President Obama decided it was appropriate to go on the "Today Show" and talk about "whose ass to kick" when it comes to the Gulf coast oil spill.

This is a program that's watched by millions of families every morning. Classy.

Then one top Republican jumped in the game.

House Minority Leader John Boehner, who wants Democrats to focus more on reducing the federal deficits, suggested Mr. Obama find someone's "ass to kick" on the budget deficit.

Nice.

Meanwhile out on the left coast - the races for California governor and Senate have devolved into nasty insults - and there are still five months to go before the election.

Democrat Jerry Brown – who's running for governor - is comparing his Republican opponent, Meg Whitman, to Nazi propaganda master Joseph Goebbels.

When pressed on the comment - Brown's people call it "jogging talk" that was "taken out of context."

Brown made these dumb remarks to a reporter on a jogging path.

Then there's Republican Carly Fiorina - who was caught insulting Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer's hair.

Fiorina's spokeswoman dismisses it as "early morning small talk."

California is broke and swimming in problems; and the newest crop of political wannabes engage in personal insults under the labels of jogging and early morning small talk.

What's small are the people making these remarks.

Here’s my question to you: Why has American politics lost any semblance of dignity?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Democrats • Republicans
June 11th, 2010
05:00 PM ET

What if high unemployment is here to stay?

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(PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Sullivan/GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

What if this time is different? What if 10 percent unemployment is the new normal.

Fortune Magazine has a sobering piece that explores whether in today's economy there is no fix for high unemployment.

In addition to all the jobs that have disappeared overseas never to return, it's all about technology. We've already seen computers and robots wipe out lots of manufacturing jobs, as well as clerical and administrative jobs. And it could just be the tip of the iceberg.

Advanced technology might one day replace not only factory workers - but also professionals and jobs that require a college degree or specialized skills.

Skeptics suggest that while new technology might eliminate some jobs - it also creates new employment sectors. Fine… but here's the catch: innovation is likely to erase jobs in more labor-intensive professions... while creating new ones that rely more on technology and don't employ as many people.

Also, whereas in the past, new technological advances would wipe out jobs in one industry at a time - for example agriculture - this time around it's expected to hit hard everywhere.

If all this is true - it could mean the U.S. needs to fundamentally change the way our economy works. Higher unemployment would likely mean a drop in consumer spending, and that's the engine that drives our economy.

It could also mean people relying more on government social safety nets - while there are fewer tax dollars coming in and our deficits are exploding.

And - Fortune Magazine suggests that mainstream economists are "completely oblivious" to the fact that the jobs may never come back. Doesn't bode well for the rest of us.

Here’s my question to you: What if high unemployment is here to stay?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Unemployment