.
January 15th, 2010
04:00 PM ET

How has technology helped following Haiti quake?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

In the hours and days following the disastrous earthquake in Haiti, technology is proving that the world is smaller than ever.

Haitians pass in front of the multi-story St. Gerard School that collapsed, leaving what is feared to be dozens trapped or killed under the rubble in Port-au-Prince.
Haitians pass in front of the multi-story St. Gerard School that collapsed, leaving what is feared to be dozens trapped or killed under the rubble in Port-au-Prince.

For starters - some of the first pictures in the aftermath of the earthquake came from social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. When there was no video yet and traditional media weren't able to broadcast... it was newer technologies that showed the world how bad things were in Haiti... and how quickly help was needed.

And, it's not just about the change in delivering information. Technology is also a key factor in relief aid. So far - it's estimated Americans pledged more than $8 million via text message to the Red Cross alone... plus millions to other charities.

The Red Cross mobilized giving efforts through social networking sites... and so far hundreds of thousands of people have donated $10 each via texts to the Red Cross. It's quick and easy... and the charge appears on the user's cell phone bill.

The text message donations for Haiti also dwarf the amounts raised after Hurricane Katrina and the Indian ocean tsunami.

Of course, this is only part of a larger flow of money being donated to Haiti... but it's significant because relief agencies are reaching young people, typically the hardest to track down... and who might not have traditionally given. Some suggest texting has "opened up a whole new world for philanthropy."

Here’s my question to you: How has technology made the world smaller following a disaster like the Haiti quake?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

Ikhan writes:
Hi Jack, The heart-warming response to this disaster from around the world in such a short time is proof that technology does make a difference. The very first glimpses of this terrible tragedy were through cell phones. One can text a contribution, use the internet or even a phone to be of help and keep abreast of developments. Rescue efforts have vastly improved because of technology. It saves lives in a manner which was unthinkable just a decade back.

Matthew in Oxnard, California writes:
Technology has made it so younger people are now donating. I'm 17 and I donated through texting. I would have never donated any other way because I don't know how. But I do know how to text.

Chris writes:
It is amazing how much the ability to text donations has affected my peer group. As a middle class, 30-year-old, I have rarely seen any mention of donations for an international emergency in the past amongst my friends. This time around, nearly all of my friends have donated. Furthermore, I was able to raise $50 around a pool table the other night just mentioning the text possibility. Within minutes, 5 people (both friends and strangers) sent $10. This is an amazing advancement.

Dawn writes:
Jack, Yes, technology has been huge in this tragedy, but so has CNN. I'm absolutely in awe of the job you all are doing. If this gives you a big head, so be it, you deserve it.

Lynn in Columbia, Missouri writes:
It's amazing and impressive… The outpouring of generosity is very heartwarming in light of our own unemployment and financial woes. It makes me feel very proud of us.

Nanette in Minnesota writes:
It certainly brings the urgency right to my living room, where I'm laying on my couch recuperating from hip surgery, feeling more fortunate by the hour that I had anesthesia for it. Feeling pretty humbled by it all, I challenged my Facebook friends to donate to the Red Cross on their cell phones today. If we have the technology, then we'd better make the most of it.


Filed under: Haiti earthquake
soundoff (161 Responses)
  1. Pedro Lazaro

    Hi, I'm sure it's made the world a more "immediate witness" to what is happening in the world. Smaller? No, its made people aware but for some reason more aloof, perhaps neglect or denial are better words. People see, hear and witness but many (not all) but many don't want to dive into it... It is only when something hits very close to home that people tend to react in ways a human being is supposed to. God forbid we have to go through something like Hait's earthquake...we couldn't deal with Katrina an earthquake of that magnitude in a big U.S. city would be beyond words...

    January 15, 2010 at 2:23 pm |
  2. Mike Anderson

    In the not so distant past, war, natural disasters, and human suffering were reported in print, with still shots primarily used to describe the pain and horror of the victims. Today, with camera phones, web cams, twitter, and even HDTV, we can quite literally experience a two dimentional feeling in real time of what those poor unfortunate souls are feeling.

    Mike, Katy, TX

    January 15, 2010 at 2:25 pm |
  3. Ardyth, London, Canada

    Technology has brought us to the realization that we are a global village and hopefully the realization that we are all in this together. Without question we see ourselves as world citizens not just a flag waver for one particular country. That said, the coverage on CNN is doing a disservice to your country as technology has made us all aware that MANY countries are pitching in, but CNN makes it seem like all USA, all the time.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:27 pm |
  4. Esther Tubis

    Why hasn't Heavy Machinery been brought into Haiti immediately to help pull up the heavy stones and material lying on haiti citizens
    caught in the fallen buildings. Where are the heavy cranes and heavy Construction machinery to help save lives, and to clear the roads so that the living haitians can receive food and water, instead of any help still relaxing at the airport as though there was time to spare.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:31 pm |
  5. Paul New Port Richey, Fl

    If you owned a cell phone Jack, you would have the answer in the palm of your hand.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:32 pm |
  6. David in Raleigh, NC

    Blackberry's, e-mail, and other technology have made it too easy to always be available.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:40 pm |
  7. Paul Round Rock, Texas

    One thing technology has done is give us all the ablity to see news of all kinds and disasters of all kinds in real time even if we do not really want to see the bad news. In one way it helps to monitor a situation and shows what needs to be done or what help people need as priority one. So I feel it is a good thing.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:41 pm |
  8. Terry Gnsbg,IN

    I'm not sure technology is doing near what they should or could. They are only 700 miles from the US, we have hopters that can land in spit'n space. Why aren't some of them getting supplies into the inner city?

    All you hear on the media is how difficult it is same as Katrina. Seems to me I saw several able bodied people at the airport and all those victoms waiting to board and get out – must be a one-way road from the city.
    They better get a bulldozer in there to dig a big grave or the troubles they've got will just be the being. I don't mean any disrespect just suggesting what I think woud be best.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:51 pm |
  9. Rick McDaniel

    It has allowed for almost instantaneous communication of the event, which allows for rapid response and saving of lives, among many of those trapped in fallen buildings.

    As usual, the first responders are US personnel.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:53 pm |
  10. Kimmy in North Carolina

    Yes Jack, technology has made the world smaller and is helping with communications in Haiti but let’s get real here.. If Haiti is such a poor country, how can they afford the technology, such as cell phones, computers, etc.? With no electric, what will be done when everyone's batteries run out?

    We but our faith and dependence on technology so much so that a clerk in Mc Donald’s can not make change unless the cash register tells them how much to give back to a customer. When a disaster like this happens we need to depend on human leadership.

    January 15, 2010 at 2:56 pm |
  11. Tom, Avon, Me, The Heart of Democracy

    It's smaller for sure. The Yarn Harlot is right now in Scandinavia, her home is in western Canada, she put the Knit-signal up on her blog and knitters all over the world donated to Doctors Without Borders for Haitians in the West Indies.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:08 pm |
  12. Jim from Chicago

    Well, Jack, it has brought us the small-minded BS from right-wing bomb throwers like Sarah Palin, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck. We get this through all kinds of convenient media, whether we want it or not. Moreover, it has allowed the world to see behind our curtain and think that we are all morons from listening to this garbage.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:11 pm |
  13. Ann from Hampton, New Jersey

    What makes the world smaller than it is is the fact that we can turn on our TV sets, check out info on our computers, and have cell phones that can capture pictures of events as they are happening and submit them to the news media who can then put them immediately on TV. This was never available when I was growing up when I felt that Europe was eons away.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:13 pm |
  14. John W.

    Jack,

    I hear a lot of excuses about why aid is slow in reaching Haiti. Has anyone thought about dropping in supplies by parachute? I know it's rough terrain, but it's an alternative to watching people die on live TV.

    John W.
    Lake Placid, FL

    January 15, 2010 at 3:14 pm |
  15. marlene

    Technology has made great strides in the way the World is kept informed. The "text" method is a great way to be able to donate, even though it will take 90 days for the money promised to begin to be released. However, the credit card companies, and Sprint, who are raking in hugh profits, because they refuse to forgo their transaction fees are a disgrace, in the face of this tragedy. Reward all of the communication companies, who are passing through 100% of these contributions, the next time you are choosing consumer products. Boycott those who aren't and don't use credit card companies for donations!

    January 15, 2010 at 3:17 pm |
  16. HUBERT bERTRAND

    Thank god you're back. I'm tired of the same thing all day and night.WE MISS YOU... WELL I DID,

    January 15, 2010 at 3:17 pm |
  17. T. Thomas in Abilene Tx.

    The things you point out are a boon for mankind. However, the same technologies-rapid air and sea travel,telecommunication, , Internet ,etc.- which bring people closer to one another are also being used by savvy really bad guys to make our world much more dangerous.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:23 pm |
  18. Doug - Dallas, TX

    Technology has made the world smaller, period. When there is a disaster like Haiti, it's a benefit to all of us, especially those in the disaster area. It still will not solve the infrastructure problems that Haiti has that is keeping most of the aid from getting to the ones that really need it.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:28 pm |
  19. Joanne B

    We need to follow exactly where the money goes as well as typically countries like Haiti Leaders have pilfered a large percentage of the money at the expense of those poor people.
    Joanne B
    MN

    January 15, 2010 at 3:41 pm |
  20. Joan Grishman

    Technology has allowed instant cell phone communication valuable in disaster situations such as this horrific earthquake, but leadership and organization is a human trait that is or is not present when needed. So, where were helicopters (like the ones used in Vietnam to deliver soldiers and supplies) with water, medicine and doctors, which could have flown over Port au Prince, hovering while dropping cargo, in the immediate 24 hours after the quake? And why isn't the supply stream organized before it lands on the runway? All the countries around Haiti have telephones, electric, etc and could be talking to each other!

    January 15, 2010 at 3:43 pm |
  21. IKHAN

    Hi Jack,

    the heart warming response to this disaster from around the world in such a short time is proof that technology does make a difference. The very first glimpses of this terrible tragedy were thru cell fones.
    One can text a contribution,use the internet or even a phone to be of help & keep abreast of developments.
    Rescue efforts have vastly improved because of technology. It saves lives in a manner which was unthinkable just a decade back.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:52 pm |
  22. Dave, Brooklyn, NY

    The world can’t get any smaller. But I would rephrase the question to ask if there has been any good to balance the evil of our obsession with gadgets to the point where we absolutely must talk to our hands 24/7 no matter what we are doing and even dumber, text when it would be ten times easier and faster just to call. The answer is yes, with the bad comes the good – sometimes.

    January 15, 2010 at 3:53 pm |
  23. Bizz, Quarryville, Pennsylvania

    Years ago before the Internet and cell phones and tragedies happen such as one in Haiti, it would take days to get an up close look at what happened, and that would always be on TV. Now with all the technology we have today, more people that otherwise would not have known, are now being made aware of what is happening around the world through the Internet and by cell phones. This I think is a good thing especially for the people in Haiti that need so much help. It is a bad thing for dictatorships such as Iran and North Korea when no matter how hard they try to stop what is happening in their countries, pictures and information are still able to reach the free world as is happening.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:03 pm |
  24. Larry from Georgetown, Tx

    There is a good side to these and a not so good side. The good side is providing people with the opportunities to help and the other side is to allow people like Rush Limbaugh to bash the help. This has been a million times better than Katrina and Rush's people did.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:07 pm |
  25. Kev, Fl

    Its aided Haiti , just like it has any other "Global" Relief fund in the past, beaming us pictures with extensive Media coverage , getting all kinds of Monitary flow moving rapidly. Sadly the same coverage and aid cannot seem to be given to Poor folks like myself and College Educated Fiance (who cant seem to find any work) , even though it seems Under Educated Others can. Wheres our media Help?

    January 15, 2010 at 4:15 pm |
  26. Steve Canada

    It has allowed the world to see how devastating the earthquake was from a more human perspective. This, perhaps takes people's minds off their own issues and realize that there are others in the world that truly are in a worse spot than us.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:15 pm |
  27. Nancy, Tennessee

    The satellite communication was of some help. No matter how much technology we have if the people who need to go help rescue these people from under buildings don't get moving fast enough there is increased loss of life. The rescue teams arrived later than they should have in my opinion. Haiti is not that far away! Whatever happened to packing your bag and getting a move on it? Or better yet having your bag ready to go and grabbing it and taking the next plane out when disaster strikes. Why does it take days to deploy a carrier from Homestead, FL? We are more prepared than that, surely.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:18 pm |
  28. anthony.....Glassboro, NJ

    Technology, Jack, brings to the forefront the hideous living conditions of other societies to our dinner tables. While America enjoys the luxury of imploding over the most minor of circumstances, we see how fortunate we really are. It's time for the USA to count its blessings and and bring more technology to those living in the dark ages. The world is now a neighborhood and countries such as Haiti can no longer be ignored. We're much better than that!

    January 15, 2010 at 4:22 pm |
  29. richard schlussel

    Dear Mr. Cafferty,

    I am writing because you can influence public policy with a potentially unorthodox but lifesaving idea.

    I am a pediatric surgeon with some experience working overseas. It is heartbreaking to see the tragedy in Haiti. But I think it is clear that due to inadequate infrastructure (airport, harbor ports, roads etc) neither Haiti nor the world will be able to deliver the basic necessities to Haitians for some time to come. It may be months or longer (years?) till there is reliable water, food, medicine and electricity for the population.

    Although perhaps controversial, I recommend a mass evacuation from Haiti with the people temporarily housed in a joint effort in the USA, Central America, Mexico, South America. An air train of planes landing and leaving in rapid succession, combined with cruise ships departing from the Dominican Republic could accomplish this.

    When services, housing and infrastructure are restored, Haitians will return to their home.

    This could be considered politically incorrect or insulting. There certainly would be hardship to be away from one's home and country. But if Haitians are left in Haiti thousands more will die needlesly from dehydration, hunger and disease.

    Thank you for your time and consideration.

    Sincerely,

    Richard Schlussel, M.D.
    Associate Director of Pediatric Urology
    Assistant Professor of Urology
    Columbia University
    Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital
    New York, N.Y.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:24 pm |
  30. Dan Nelson Lafayette,IN

    If we have food, water, medicine and supplies there and cannot get it to the people, I don't think technology is the answer. I think technology has just shown the world how inept we are in distributing the supplies.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:24 pm |
  31. Linda in Arizona

    Just like you said, Jack. What more can I add?

    January 15, 2010 at 4:29 pm |
  32. Alexander Tate

    It has made it easy to donate but it has made those in charge of the relief any smarter. water must be the main concern on day one. You last weeks without food, only 3Days without water.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:29 pm |
  33. Lucy

    One way to answer this question is to imagine how the reaction would have been if we didn't have the technology we have now. Imagine nobody saw the devastating images, nobody donated through phone, and relief agencies weren't reaching these young people. Haiti would have primarily been left to deal with this disaster through it's own resources...I would say a great deal of lives have been saved because of technology.
    Laura

    January 15, 2010 at 4:32 pm |
  34. ran utah

    Technology has made the world smaller. It seems to give you the idea that you really do matter in this world. Most people won't do certain things like vote for the presidents govenors, as they cannot see exactly what there vote does. This situation in Haiti as well as other recent events small or big, people are carrying these small devises in their pockets , purses ,or cars etc., They can automaticlly do something within their power and they can follow the outcomes of these events. They essentially count in society, now. They now matter. They have a sense that they made a difference. Everyone at some point feels that no matter what they do or feel their opinion doesn't matter. Some people stand up to that and become politicians in an attempt to change things. Others generally just believe throughout life that they don't matter. Now with technology at their fingertips more people have lost that feeling of,"I don't matter", and gained the idea that "I do".

    January 15, 2010 at 4:33 pm |
  35. Subhash

    Techonology definately makes it possible to reach / know about these disasters very much faster than before.However,the main problem lies in the fact that sincence humans are involved in the disbursement of relief co-ordination efforts needs to be very well planned.Also the size and promptness of action depends on the zone / country the disaster falls in,if it were Cuba,would the US be that aggressive in its help?

    January 15, 2010 at 4:37 pm |
  36. J Atlanta

    It may sound cynical, but technology has allowed more people to live in smaller spaces, which in turn produces yet more people. Port Au Prince was built for sixty thousand people. Yet two million live there. Population growth isn't a remedy for sparse resources. This lesson seems also to be lost in America.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:42 pm |
  37. Richard Texas

    Jack I agree that technology has made the world a smaller place. It still has not made the helpless feelings any better for those not knowing about their loved ones condition. Haiti is a tuff place to get into and out of. So tuff in fact help had to be turned away because they could not land and had to circle for hours only to be turned away. That is a pretty helpless feeling Jack to come to help and be told to leave because there is no place to park when you get here.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:49 pm |
  38. Earl LeSiege

    I am both positively amazed and negatively discouraged by the CNN media. On one hand the reports of the tragedy in Haiti are precise and informative. On the other hand the reporting of the negatives of this tragedy outway the positives 5 to 1. When I hear a commentator questioning who authorized the burial of corpses in a location rather then explaining that the presense of 50,000 plus bodies lying above ground can, in itself, cause more deaths then the eartquake.
    Although, I am no expert, LOGIC dictates that since no one mass grave could handle this enormous amout of casualities, mass graves should be created in neighbohoods as memorials to the deceased to allow local friends and relatives to honor these people. These graves should be done as soon as humanly possible to prevent further deaths by diseases that the bodies can create.
    More info on reasons why relief hasn't reached an area then simply showing that people are not being served may not be as dramatic as the negativereaction to the situation.
    Come on MEDIA PEOPLE, lets try to be more realistic than DRAMATIC. If you are going to ask questions, use some COMMON SENSE, and good taste. Explain to these people you are interviewing the efforts and problems acheiving them, rather then leaving them in the dark and criticiziing the efforts.
    Earl LeSiege
    Earl LeSiege

    January 15, 2010 at 4:49 pm |
  39. Rick Medina,OH

    Jack,

    The Internet has really changed the world. It is probably the most important innovation in a generation. It is an enabling technology, and people continue to find new ways to use it. It allows 21 year old kids to become instant millionaires, and it appears to scare the hell out of tyrants like Iran and China. It is good to hear that it is now being used to increase and speed delivery of aid to Haiti.

    Rick, Medina, OH

    January 15, 2010 at 4:55 pm |
  40. Meg from Troy

    Jack–
    I think that techology has made all of us neighbors. No place on earth is really far away now–technology has brought us closer.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:57 pm |
  41. Joe G. (Illinois)

    It’s amazing to think what money donations and media coverage can do for people in the aftermath of such groundbreaking calamities… It’s like every “Who of Who” wants to get their name and photo in the news. But everybody knows that which takes to have the last laugh is not a mere farce!

    January 15, 2010 at 4:57 pm |
  42. ken, DOVER, de

    Technology is of no help to haiti since there are very little computers no electricity or communications towers in operation. They need picks, shovels, saws, building supplies, medical supplies and skilled labor. Collecting money is fine but will it go to the people. Where is the local government, military, police and fire department? It looks like obama has decided on his own to take over another country and will begin nation building without any action by the u.s. congress or the haiti government.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:57 pm |
  43. D/st Louis

    When I was growing up, there were manual typewriters, black and white TV's, and computers that looked like dinosours. These days we can make video's and type on color screens smaller than the palms of most people hands, we can type in a few numbers and raise millions of dollars in minutes. We can fly in supplies from around the world, and save lives. I thank God for brilliant minds.

    January 15, 2010 at 4:57 pm |
  44. Lou from North Carolina

    Technology is like statistics. You can use it for what you want to use it for. If technology told someone in Haiti that a 7.0 earthquake was coming in 3 hours, of what use would it be? Only to clear the buildings but where would the people go? It would have been very good if the buildings could have been cleared because they were built out of concrete to fight hurricanes and concrete doesn't do too well in an earthquake, so simply clearing the buildings might have been very useful.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:01 pm |
  45. Annie, Atlanta

    Technology certainly has made a difference as far as our ability to contact others with the same technology, but it sure hasn’t improved logistics. It’s nice to reach out and tell the world you need something like water. Getting that water there is another story.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:04 pm |
  46. Michael & Diane M Phoenix AZ

    It makes it much quicker to find out what's going on down there, but there is still a time lag in getting things done.....that is unless you happen to be Rush Limbaugh, then technology is his downfall, especially after his statements on the air about how this is a good publicity stunt for Pres. Obama. Limbaugh...what a DOLT!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:09 pm |
  47. George, Montrose,PA

    Although this disaster is such a sad, sad event, it most definately shows the upside and the blessing of modern technology. I cannot help but think of the jobless situation that we face here at home though and the many thousands of jobs this same modern technology has stolen. The American people will still give what they can to help people all over the world in such devastation as this. God bless America!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:10 pm |
  48. Barbara Actisdano

    Jack,
    Without CNN-NEWS this Country would not know anything about the EARTHQUAKE as I looked for the Breaking News and no other Channel was alerted! We are lucky to have the news men and women out on the first plane to land and get the pictures and news every day and night back to the people., all the Hatri
    people who live in this Country. They must be sitting by the T.V. every minute of the day for word of their loved ones. It is hard to think of the anxiousness of the people waiting. Thank God for CNN-NEWS REPORTERS ALSO, We should all PRAY FOR THEM ALSO.
    Barbara from Sebring, FL.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:12 pm |
  49. William Courtland

    Instant charity messaging, its ability is fast and technology could not easily allow for a faster response of those able to donate via system logic.

    Media is the line out, while forces arrive the true fact that all international media agents are using satellite communications method(when not on air: help local colaboration efforts via a chosen body of central command and organization: in check with local officials and international aide venues: and truly use social networking to allow for communication between these many bodies: a facebook page for all services to be arranged by a majority service: the Red Cross found holding a page, CNN found holding a page to the aligned services(but keeping them semi-private to allow the direct flow of pertenant information.

    They really need to return to a more 1800's method to facilitate the total needs of all the displaced: but that doesn't mean modern technology does not have a place in immediate efforts in humanitarian rescue.

    Water, food, shelter, security: a future.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:24 pm |
  50. Tina Tx

    We cuss it but yet we need it and thank goodness since it brought the world to help out the Haitians and you are right CNN is doing an outstanding job and I thank you.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:24 pm |
  51. Jeff Crocket in New Britain, CT

    It shows once again how wonderful capitalism and innovation can be!!

    And imagine Jack! The government didn't create it!!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:25 pm |
  52. Injemanze

    Texting technology has obviously made an impact by getting younger segments of the population actively involved in immediate aid efforts.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:26 pm |
  53. Ray Callahan from Coral Springs, FL

    Instant gratification can have it's benefits. We have used facebook and texting to share the news and will have a pray vigil tonight at our church and a container to fill with supplies next week. Youth is very active in helping to make this happen!

    Welcome to the 21st Century.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:26 pm |
  54. Chris

    Except for Foxnews, the TV and internet has been great in proving minute by minute coverage which for folks in So FL and NYC is priceless.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:26 pm |
  55. James

    I know of one way that it has helped. You can donate just by text messaging and the money will be added to your next phone bill.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:26 pm |
  56. Matthew Schmitz Oxnard,CA

    Technology has made it so younger people are now donating. I'm 17 and I donated through texting. I would of never donated any other way because I don't know how. But I do know how to text.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:27 pm |
  57. Glenn Minnick

    It's great that people can make donations by texting...quick and easy. When I heard Secretary Clinton make the plea early yesterday morning, I sent out a bulk-email to over 64,000 other real estate agents in my firm in the U.S. as well as my email database of over 5,000. I received over a hundred of emails thanking me from colleagues who made text donations! The power of the internet and texting to do good things in this troubled world is wonderful!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:27 pm |
  58. Scott, IL

    Through facebook, i have fictional characters, like "Alan" from the hangover telling me to donate... it makes it more fun to donate.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:27 pm |
  59. Jim McDade Birmingham, Al

    Communications technology has helped raise funds for Haiti, but other technology like GPS also helps by allowing rescue workers to plan and execute there missions. Technology, often portrayed as an evil thing, is as indispensable aid when humans need powerful tools to solve problems.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm |
  60. Chris

    It is amazing how much the ability to text donations has affected my peer group. As a middle class, 30 year old, I have rarely seen any mention of donations for an international emergency in the past amongst my friends. This time around, nearly all of my friends have donated. Furthermore, I was able to raise $50 around a pool table the other night just mentioning the text possibility. Within minutes, 5 people (both friends and strangers) sent $10. This is an amazing advancement, especially assuming that the funds are available almost immediately.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm |
  61. Himelda Rivera

    The quickness and easiness that the text messaging donation was made it possible for me, and other young people to donate. Networks like facebook and twitter helps spread the word about the big news, because young people are constantly on them. I have instant twitter updates on my phone, so that's how I found out about the earthquake and what to do to help!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm |
  62. D. Hare, Dover, Fl

    It assisted me in donating $$$ to the relief efforts in Haiti. I encourage each and every of viewers to do the same.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm |
  63. Demmarie McKay

    I feel that text messaging has opened a window for kids and teens to make a difference. I remember being a kid and would watch Natural disasters and want to help but couldn't cause i was too young and really just didn't know how to. I appreciate "YELE" 501501 AND THE RED CROSS cause kids can make a difference and feel like they made a difference.🙂

    January 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm |
  64. michael armstrong sr. TX.

    Jack it hasnt made it small enough for the credit card companeys they were all standing in line to collect there part on someone else's travisty thank god some one stood up and told them to put there hands back in there pockets.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:29 pm |
  65. Dawn Lee

    Jack,
    Yes, technology has been huge in this tragedy, but so has CNN. I'm absolutely in awe of the job you all are doing. If this gives you a big head, so be it, you deserve it.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:29 pm |
  66. Kathy

    The texting to HAITI 90999 is the greatest thing in the world! I'm a 56-year-old transcriptionist from Omaha, Nebraska–not ypur typical techie, and I was able to give $10 to the Red Cross just by sending a text on my cell phone. It only took about 1 minute! How great is that? You can bet I'll be helping out anyone and everyone in the fuure with this technology available.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:29 pm |
  67. John in Lake Tahoe NV

    Jack, modern communications technology has been a big help – remember when we had to rely on "ham" radio operators? – but I think the real lesson is how, in the end, it's all about ordinary people caring for ordinary people and our true connectedness one with another that transcends" things" like cell phones or the Internet.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:29 pm |
  68. Dayle

    Technology is playing an amazing part in making all of us honest and accountable. Texting in a donation makes it so easy to help each other no matter where we are. I immediately donated instead of trying to remind myself to do it later.
    We're all in this together. Donation by texting allows us to be closer.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:30 pm |
  69. Tony (Hawarden, IA)

    In today's connected – and individualized world, technology can play a major role in bringing all of humanity back to its base need. We all need, at times, someone to lean on and someone to trust.

    This Haitian disaster is a solid view of the potential for technology to bring people together the world over. Millions of dollars raised at unprecedented rates, and immediate coverage of events that would never be seen otherwise.

    This, in the darkest hour of need, can create a bright beacon of hope. Instead of focusing on the negatives technology bring to the world, lets see what is possible in the positive realm. Thank you for being so constant in your coverage, and remember that hope begets hope.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:30 pm |
  70. Dave Roberts

    It's absolutely incredible Jack. Without tech advances like Twitter, Facebook, Skype etc. we wouldn't have gotten initial information from Haiti as quickly as we did. I know you'll agree also that streaming and satellite technology has made it possible for journalists to get their stories out. Great job on CNN's part for the coverage I must say.

    Dave Roberts
    Springfield Missouri

    January 15, 2010 at 5:30 pm |
  71. Amy Drzemala

    I feel that the improvement in technology for natural disasters has be tremendous. I typically donate 1 or 2 time a year to local organizations but today I used the text option through the Red Cross. I searched online for ways to donate and found that being able to text my donation was much faster and easier. It makes it nice for those individuals you may not have credit cards or computer access.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |
  72. GregYohn

    The new technologies have disbursed the information quickly, but at the same time it has increased the distance from the have nots from the haves.

    Those in Haiti without electricity are not able to use their phones to text their friends, even if they have a cell phone.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |
  73. Manecha Guillaume

    Technology is the single handedly most effective way to reach out and donate to the peope of Haiti. Through a simple text, thousands of people have donated money to this effort. I strongly believe that if it were not for this way of donating, the amount of money that is being raised would not be as much. Thank you to the Red Cross and the Yele Organization for making this effective for everyone to donate.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |
  74. Desiree Altemus

    How can we ensure that the $10 goes to Haiti assistance and not Visa or other credit cards that I use to pay my Verizon bill? I think credit cards should institute a waiver on any transaction fees from here on in so that their coffers don't get bigger at the expense of the charities. For example, Doctor's Without Borders are not exempt from this type of credit card transaction fee.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |
  75. James R Lang

    I dont know about you jack but this old guy had to donate the old
    fashioned way I cant get the hang of that texting thing.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:31 pm |
  76. Dante

    Tech has completely revolutionized philanthropy. I love to donate and help but an often too busy to physically exert resources. ‘Donatexting’ is revolutionizing businesses like the Red Cross and other relief funds. Yesterday I sent $10 via "Haiti" to 90999 and that was the first donation to a natural disaster that I have given, primarily because it was so easy.

    Dante, 24, Costa Mesa

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  77. Garrett

    I think it is a great idea to reach a larger audience for donations. However, as a information security professional myself, I feel it is important to remind those making donations via such mechanisms to confirm the legitimacy of the actual source requesting them via social media and texting. Scammers thrive on disaster and are looking for ways to divert your good-hearted donations i to their own pockets.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  78. Ed

    texting (and technology in general) has made it easier, BUT the money is NOT available until AFTER you pay your phone bill- up to 3 months later per experts interviewed regarding it.
    Luckily the banks and most phone companies (not Sprint) have waived their fees THIS time.., but may not next disaster.....corporations like making money too much to continue this generous 1 time fee waiver...however, technology's ugly side did raise its head with ability of Robertson to spew his stupidity and insanity instantly on air as did Limbaugh..with the good comes the bad s usual

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  79. James Brooks

    I think that it is great..I myself have texted a donation...It is a way to send money and it is done without any effort..Plus you will not miss it cause most people are going to pay their phone bill..

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  80. Howard Chicago

    Technology has shown this disaster in real time. Never before has this extent of human suffering been displayed in real time. The old saying out of sight out of mind is no more. T

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  81. Barbara Voigt

    Smart phones are what has made the world smaller. It seems like everybody has one and pictures come in immediately from every point in the world. And CNN has made the world smaller with your excellent coverage.
    Angels Camp, California

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  82. Andrew (Boca Raton)

    Hello as a college student at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, the new and innovative advances in technology has dramatcially affected the efficiency of requesting donations during a crisis such as this.

    I received an email today stating that a former linebacker from FAU was setting up a command post to drop off needed items. By the time I received it, went to the store for supplies, and dropped them off, they had many many workers were sorting, packing and preparing to ship off aide items.

    I believe that by offering text messaging as a form of aide requesting will have a broader affect as many will find this type of technology faster and much more efficient method instead of phoning some aide businesses such as the Red Cross etc.

    As long as it remains for aide efforts, by volunterily texting certain numbers, it will only have a positive affect, unless solicitors obtain the phone numbers from these texters.

    Please continue America by providing the aide desparetly needed. My family has missionary friends in Haiti, who have lost co-workers and many many best friends in this disaster

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  83. bill

    technology is great for showing pictures, but this technology could better be used to pinpoint areas where critical supplies could be parachuted in.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  84. Roman, Butler, Pa

    Hey Jack, Wolf. It's a good thing. Maybe through this Great Earthquake and now texting human beings can begin to understand what it truly means to be part of a community. A community of mankind helping his fellow brothers and sisters. Just because the color of their skin or accent in their voice is different from ours doesn't mean their not part of humanity.

    And, as for the younger generations, they are growing up now. Cause they understand better than some adults do about humanity.

    But, I can also see the day where a gazillion texts will be sent out everyday give to this cause or give to that cause all the while it's nothing but a scam.

    But for now, Let it be.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  85. Rex

    Jack, technology is a wonderful thing, isn't it. Unfortunately we as human beings haven't gained much in the common sense area.
    There sits Haiti, a sub 3rd world country, sitting closer to our shores than the U.K. And yet, long before this insurmountable tragedy, Haitians have lived in squalor and hopelessness. As I see the money tallies mount into the millions and millions and surely billions before it's over, I can't help but wonder where all of this money was before the damned earthquake. Providing a stable infrastructure years ago would have surely alleviated the magnitude of this disaster.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  86. Howard Chicago

    Technology has shown this disaster in real time. Never before has this extent of human suffering been displayed in real time. The old saying out of sight out of mind is no more.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:32 pm |
  87. MetroCynic

    The impact of technology on this disaster is almost immeasurable, as soon as I heard about the "Yele" $5$10 text and "Haiti" text donations on CNN Wednesday evening I sent texts to everyone on my cell phone contact list giving the instructions to my family and friends and asking them to text everyone on their contact list. I also posted the request on my Facebook page reminding them. The mapped images and videos coming out are helping tremendously giving us a idea of the dire straits the Haitians are in. Thank You CNN

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  88. Earl California

    I have always hesitated making donations because I hate to see my funds used (in part) for postage to send me unending follow-up solicitations. What I like about texting funds is that I feel more assured that my donation will go were I intended- helping the helpless.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  89. Dan

    It's helped in the obvious ways, but it hasn't helped in the grubby physical tasks of clearing wreckage or pulling people out of it.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  90. Spencer Cineus

    Techonology is extremely important in this effort, not only it's because of social netroking site a lot of informations were becoming available but also technology raises millions that not would have been raired otherwise. I live in NY right now I'm in Miami due to technology I was able to donate money to foundations like Yele Haiti, the Red Cross and the Clinton Foundation online.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  91. Gary from Wisconsin

    technology has made the world smaller, but the important thing has it made it SMARTER-hopefully we are getting "smarter" as we get smarter!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  92. Laney

    I think the most important thing, that has happen especially with face book is it allow us Haitians in the U.S. to keep in touch with each other and some who have acess to internet in Haiti and exchange information. We found out that my uncle and cousin were okay because of family friends who recieved a status update from their family, and they happen to be neighbors to them and let us know they were ok but had no means of communicating

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  93. Garrett in York, PA

    I think it is a great idea to reach a larger audience for donations. However, as a information security professional myself, I feel it is important to remind those making donations via such mechanisms to confirm the legitimacy of the actual source requesting them via social media and texting. Scammers thrive on disaster and are looking for ways to divert your good-hearted donations into their own pockets.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  94. Debra Eisenberg

    Debra, Gaithersburg, Maryland: Jack - Technology advances and adoption, including cell phones (w/ photos and video and text), FaceBook, MySpace and CNN's ireports, major breaking news has been captured and shared by millions to millions of individual stories. This has created an unprecedented intimacy and empathy for viewers. Never before have we seen deeply personal, tragic and compelling perspectives of news developments - from the recent Haiti quake and aftermath to the periodic rebellions in oppressed countries. People relate to people, and the more personal, intimate and poignant the medium and message, the shorter and smaller the distances between us. And, once that impact is felt, that bond created, this same technology enables us to quickly and effortlessly respond with a text offering relief, a mouse click offering assistance or celebrities and countries voicing their support and facilitating major relief.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  95. RJ from Lake,MI

    Technology is making more unemployed people! Answer to your question Jack, Haiti is in the shape they are in minus the disasters because of the very people who are running that country period! Poorly ran countrties such as Haiti cant rely on everybody else because they are becoming as poor as Haiti is! Look at all the millions of jobs outsourced in this country all in the name of saving labor costs but the same products are stilll being made with slave labor now but the prices for these goods have only gone up! With all the savings in labor costs products everywhere should be lower but they are not! This outsourcing of American Jobs needs to stop and outsourcing companies need to be taxed on the amount they have save in labor costs. Nothing is made in this country, and with that this country can not withstain its way of life now or for future generations! This is what is called Facism, look it up, Hitler might ring a bell for some of you that have no idea! Facism is when corperating and big business set the agenda for government and the rest of the country! Is this what Americans really want? I dont think so!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  96. Lateef

    No question, techonology has changed & will continue to change the world forever. I'm a regular guy who works a 9-5 as a Financial Advisor but in my spare time I have 3 websites, a facebook, myspace & twitter profile, a non-profit organization named 1 S.O.U.L. and an Iphone with several thousand friends. Most of these people I've never actually met but with a few clicks of a button and a matter of minutes I was able to share not only information of the relief efforts in Haiti but pictures, links to organizations offering assistance, texts codes for donations and also receive people's thoughts, comments, videos and additional info in response! Technology not only makes it easier & quicker to respond but it helps to make us more compassionate because we can actually feel the minute by minute ordeals of these far away places...

    January 15, 2010 at 5:33 pm |
  97. Steve in Las Vegas,NV

    The word and with pictures were out even before the first news crew could even start to move.

    The technology that makes this even possible is so amazing and has really paid off.

    Now maybe this technology can help get the aid to those who need it most.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  98. Eileen Ledgerwood

    It is Katrina all over again. Iceland got aid to Haiti before we did! I hope all these well intended camera hogs in Washington stop sending messages and get those poor people some food and water. By the time food and water "distribution" sites were set up in Houston after Ike our grocery stores were open again. The civilians in goverment need to step aside and let our experienced military leaders take control of the situation in Haiti before scores more die.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  99. Nanette Blom

    It certainly brings the urgency right to my living room, where I'm laying on my couch recuperating from hip surgery, feeling more fortunate by the hour that I had anesthesia for it. Feeling pretty humbled by it all, I challenged my Facebook friends to donate to the Red Cross on their cell phones today. If we have the technology, then we'd better make the most of it. By the way, CNN is doing a hell of a job, as usual.

    Nanette Blom
    Barnum MN

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  100. Kate

    I'm so proud of my colleagues in technical fields, especially in telecommunications. People are being found as they call for help with their cell phones. Pictures of survivors or news of survivors are being instantly shared with loved ones around the world. Had this happened 10 years ago, or even 5 years ago when cell phones were less prevalent, these survivors may not have been found.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  101. Lesley, Lighthouse Point, FL

    Anderson Cooper, Gary Tuchman, Susan Candiotti and Sanjay Gupta got into Port Au Prince with equipment sophisticated enough to broadcast this stuff we are seeing from a disaster zone. Their coverage has prompted the world to donate. It is the broadcast technology that has brought this story to us. That is what impresses me the most.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  102. K Campbell

    Jack; Technology they really needed to be rolled off the first flight's to Haiti were very large caterpillar front end loader's. These machine's would have quickly cleared debris off the road's clearing the way for search and rescue, food and water, medical eq't etc., but here we are four day's in and road access is still problematic.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  103. Azure

    Some of the images you continue to broadcast are very poor quality including some of the sound bites that are also not understandable.
    The point is why do you continue to show the same file footage over and over, and over again ? and why not work to resolve the technical issues you are having with taping and show only what is current. It comes across as CNN chaos when you fail to provide a chronological series of events which is what we the viewers would want to know.
    I have been watching daily and it gets frustrating to hear something is current when it isn't, CNN can and should do better reporting than that.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:34 pm |
  104. Madina Noristani

    I personally think that one has to be careful when it comes to praising technologies and their impact in the afthermath of the haiti catastrophe. Surely, I support those who send a text to donate a few dollars. However, I dont think joining a Facebook group that declares openly that " every member will donate $1" , is reliable. People join for prestige and dont donnate or help at all. And dedicating your facebook status to the victims help them in any way. I hardly doubt that any of them will be able to ready of those homages. Networking wont directly help the victims. And in times like this , direct help is what they need the most.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:35 pm |
  105. Judi Wolf

    This crisis shows how imperative and important technology in the form of social networking has become in our world today. Look where it has taken us and the improvements in communication, especially when it is of utmost importance. The problem is that our schools and school boards are preventing our students from learning to use these tools effectively and ethically because they filter and block them from schools. It is an irrational fear of what our students will see or do that is preventing them from having and using these valuable tools. Its preposterous!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:35 pm |
  106. N. Calderon

    Technology has definetely made us more AWARE of what is happening on a global scale. When it comes to the average person beng able to help, phone companies allow us an easy way to help not only in relief efforts but also to ease our conscience and duties to mankind. However with all the might we may have with technology, mother nature certainly can bring us to our knees, where ll we can do is pray. God help those who are suffering.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:35 pm |
  107. Tim Rigney

    I think that technology has helped in several different ways following the Haiti quake; for example people are able to text the word "Haiti" to 90999 and ten dollars will be sent towards relief efforts. Alternatively, they can give blood, which must be sorely needed, and there's this big fancy modern thing called an AIRPLANE which can get it to them fast. On the down side, there's a danger that all of us will sit around twiddling our thumbs answering silly questions on the Internet while there's a million people dying and in need of desperate help within a few hundred miles of our borders. And while we call ourselves "the moral leaders of the Free World."
    I've heard many people say in the past few days "there for the grace of God go we." It's just simply not true; this IS going to happen to the United States one day; for example there's this little ol' thing called a fault line in California. Not to belittle the serious effort that is already underway, but this crisis demands EVERY resource and EVERY effort from those who are able to help.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:35 pm |
  108. Jeremie

    Technology has definitely become the backbone for communication today. The flow of information is so much faster and as we have seen, a simple text or blog is all it takes in finding out if your family is alive and well. IMHO, texting is now the most effective way in donating to this cause. Its fast, simple and effective. May God be with Haiti.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:36 pm |
  109. Madina Noristani

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    I personally think that one has to be careful when it comes to praising technologies and their impact in the afthermath of the haiti catastrophe. Surely, I support those who send a text to donate a few dollars. However, I dont think joining a Facebook group that declares openly that " every member will donate $1" , is reliable. People join for prestige and dont donnate or help at all. And dedicating your facebook status to the victims doesnt help them in any way. I hardly doubt that any of them will be able to ready of those homages. Networking wont directly help the victims. And in times like this , direct help is what they need the most.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:36 pm |
  110. Christine from Ontario Canada

    Hi Jack,

    Given the tremendous generousity shown by the United States and lead on navigating the logistics of supplies and medical personnel in Haiti, I would like to know if any of the terrorists in the world would like to make a comment or if they have anything positive to add in the form of help for your 'fellow man'. Please tell me why anyone would want to join you and not the United States. This is why the United States will win the war on terror. They build things, they help people, they care for their fellow man.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:36 pm |
  111. marcellus

    hi!!!!
    I am an Haitian student who lives in Brooklyn... this is the worst thing that could happen to my country, and now there's no communication there...no network coverage..the largest cellphone company back there is DIGICEL, they posted on their site that they get like 3 airplanes with technicians and equipments to restore the network so they are not allow to get there so if we, Haitian people like me, have a chance to hear from their relative there that will be a big sign...please spread the message that they could allow the DIGICEL plane get there as soon as possible cause communications is critical is this situation....peace!!!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:36 pm |
  112. Jester

    I think this a good example cell phones being put to good use. Thanks to them, we are now aware of disasters in places like Haiti, as though it was happening in our own back yard, at a much faster rate than in the past. We often associate cell phones with being used irresponsibly because idiots often use it while driving. Maybe when we send care packages to countries like Haiti after natural disasters, we can take cell phones confiscated from reckless drivers who use them while driving. It will probably help people there a heck of a lot better than being misused by irresponsible drivers. Thanks Jack, keep up the good work.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:36 pm |
  113. mariehelene56

    Dear Jack, I respect you highly as a journalist of rare integrity and intelligence. However, I have to say that I don't entirely agree that technology has made the world a smaller place. In some ways, yes. Images and messages can now be transported worldwide as soon as disasters occur. Millions of dollars can be raised in a couple of days via cellphones. But there is a downside to all of this. Messages, images, and electronic donations are not hands. They do not have arms to dig someone out, hold a child, offer a sandwich, a bottle of water, clean a wound or wrap a bandage. The images have the power to stir our desire to help with our hands and hearts but we can only push buttons. And I think while it may raise funds which are needed, the technological balm also contributes to a widespread sense of anxiety, frustration, loneliness and alienation. Our primitive emotions are stirred but they are also thwarted. I wish there were a way to mobilize the human network to allow more of us to offer hands on help and to use our hearts and able bodies to express the sorrow and empathy we feel and to contribute bodily, rather than just pushing send with one finger.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:37 pm |
  114. Madina Noristani

    I personally think that one has to be careful when it comes to praising technologies and their impact in the afthermath of the haiti catastrophe. Surely, I support those who send a text to donate a few dollars. However, I dont think joining a Facebook group that declares openly that " every member will donate $1" , is reliable. People join for prestige and dont donnate or help at all. And dedicating your facebook status to the victims doesnt help them in any way. I hardly doubt that any of them will be able to read any of those homages. Networking wont directly help the victims. And in times like this , direct help is what they need the most.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:37 pm |
  115. b penney

    hey jack if it was not for technology the people of haiti would not get half the help it is getting..but even better then that is what all you guys at CNN are doing showing the world just what's going on at this poor country. i would say over 3/4 of the money going to haiti is becouse all what CNN is doing.THANK YOU VERY MUCH FROM CANADA

    January 15, 2010 at 5:37 pm |
  116. Nina Bachvarova

    We are extremely fortunate to live in a decade when technology is fairly accessible throughout the world! In the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake, we not only became aware of the wide devastation and loss of life but we were also able to contribute to the international effort in helping the people in need. Donation through texting is a wonderful way to encourage even the young generation to help in such disasters!!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:37 pm |
  117. JAMES SAINTILIEN

    As a first generation haitian-american I thank God for technology. As a 28 year old entrepruner it makes it easy for me to give back to folks in my parent's homeland that I have a responsibilty of aiding in the reconstruction of Haiti. Technology will be my allie as I help my Haitian people develop service skills to help bring a new industry of outsourcing to Haiti,after learning and working for huge companies like Directv, AIG, and Bank of America.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:38 pm |
  118. Jeremie

    Technology has definitely become the backbone for communication today. The flow of information is so much faster and as we have seen, a simple text or blog is all it takes in finding out if your family is alive and well. IMHO, texting is now the most common way in donating to this cause. Its fast, simple and effective. May God be with Haiti.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:38 pm |
  119. Harry Richardson

    Technology of this sort, has allowed us to network our world in a more personal and intimate way. Thus bringing us closer to one another. Can you imagine a disaster of this magnitude say 25-30 years ago, there would be no way to raise this kind of relief help this soon. This technology is truly a tremendous blessing to our world.....

    January 15, 2010 at 5:38 pm |
  120. Lynn, Columbia, Mo.

    It's amazing and impressive. I just hope the Red Cross uses all the money on Haiti instead of saving some for possible future disasters, like they did with Katrina. The outpouring of generosity is very heartwarming in light of our own unemployment and financial woes. It makes me feel very proud of us.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:38 pm |
  121. margrit maassch, phoenix, arizona

    It certainly made the average person more aware about the suffering people go through, not only with this Earthquake but also through war in various regions.
    For the first time it is shown clearly to everyone how people have to suffer.
    Usually the extreme scenes had always been cut out to not hurt the sensitivity of people. That was defffinately wrong.
    The general public has to be educated about this.
    We have not experience hunger or thirst and always had sufficient medical care. Scenes like these in Haiti make people aware what suffering really means.
    I feel with these people, because when I was 15 years old I dug out people from rubble after a bombing rade and also picked up body pieces after a train was bombed..
    It gave me a tough but in the long run a good education to understand suffering of all sorts.
    Technology is great, we just have to again learn more how to use it properly.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:39 pm |
  122. Nick Cobb

    Absolutely fantastic! When a disaster hits, everyone wants to help. It's so easy to just use your phone and send $5-100 immediately. What a great tool! Now, there is no excuse not to respond!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:39 pm |
  123. Diane Dagenais Turbide

    Hi Jack,

    technology allows more communication between people to have real impact on their world and this comes with great responsibilities. Not only is the world getting smaller but maybe it will get better at the same time from being involved in our world!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:39 pm |
  124. Luci - Illinois

    Yes.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:39 pm |
  125. Susan

    The ability to donate on line through the American Red Cross web site and the World Food Programme made it easy and quick to donate $20 the day of the earthquake to WFP when I saw the information on CNN about the highly fortified biscuits. Then today I was able to donate $10 to the American Red Cross with a designated to the Haiti Relief Effort very easily on line.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:40 pm |
  126. Marvin Lee-Arcadia, California

    Technology has helped spread the message of supporting a good cause such as donating to a charity for disaster victims such as Haiti.

    However, the major challenge is importing the necessary technological equipment to Haiti for search and rescue operations, medical facilities and finding the dead. With the extant of the current damage, physical obstacles including but not limited to road accessibility, airfield access and security show that technology is not a total solution in solving problems.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:40 pm |
  127. fab30rock

    regarding the question you just posed online "How has technology helped following Haiti quake?" I can give testimony that technology was a friend, an educator, a comforter, and a much needed distraction during these past 4 days since the earthquake hit Haiti. When i first heard about the earthquake i turned to CNN and was getting good info, but it was too early for any news network to know what really was going on in Haiti. I wasnt as worried that tuesday night although i was very concerned about my father who had just went there on vacation 2 weeks ago. After many rounds of phone calls with members of my family we went to bed hoping to hear more in the morning. Wednesday morning the reality of the situation in Haiti came to lite with Anderson copper being there. Thats when i panicked and started checking all of the resources CNN mentioned. And for the first time I decided to engage in social media because the news media was vouching for their early reportings in getting the info out. I started following the LA times twitter list and Ireport postings. I became addicted. We still had no news of my father and found out that my uncle had just wen to Haiti on monday and he was unaccounted for as well. I was checking every twitter list and cnn story to see how we can get a hold of our family in Haiti. We were all trying every phone number we had to no avail. On thursday morning i signed up for a twitter account "fab30rock" and stated posting my father & uncle's info. But i was also very absorbed with the front line tweets and postings from people in Haiti. At times i began to enjoy getting the tweets and it took my mind off worrying. Other times i would anxiously wait for new tweets and Ireports. I wasnt able to get on facebook because my job blocks that site. But i had a link to follow as well. In the end i really think i formed bond with those people posting tweet updates & ireports and such. We never met, and really didnt interact personally over the social media networks that we shared, but they provided a great service to me in my time of needing to know what the situation was like and what was happening good and bad. Happy to say that early this morning i received news that my uncle and father are ok and they are just waiting to get a flight out. Thank you technology for coming to my aid.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:41 pm |
  128. Eli (Gaithersburg, MD)

    I'm sure that technology has played a huge part especially in mobilising funds towards help to Haitians. Thanks to it people got got the bad news and took necessary steps to play a part in the whole thing. Believe it or not, without those pictures, videos, televised reports, we wouldn't have any idea of the extent of the disaster. Thank God for those discoveries that make us move forward AND help others who need us.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:42 pm |
  129. Dawson from MN

    Technology is playing a great part in this relief effort. Aid agencies have realized we here in the US are too lazy for conventional forms of donating. What's next we tweet our donations? But when I get past my pessimism it's always a great thing to see people being generous to charities in times of great need. The downside however to technology is that this won't keep our attention long. The next flash in the pan will leave the Haitian people back to their own devices as we rush to save someone else, somewhere else. Personally, I wish the Haitian people the best in moving past this tragedy and saving loved ones presently.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:42 pm |
  130. Peter Johnston RI

    Jack; All the technology and the attached donations will be totally useless if those donations don;t reach the masses who are in dire straits; Read between these lines and please beware; Lets not have another post 9–11

    January 15, 2010 at 5:42 pm |
  131. Rex

    Jack, technology is a wonderful thing, isn't it. Unfortunately we as human beings haven't gained much in the common sense area.
    There sits Haiti, a sub 3rd world country, sitting closer to our shores than the U.K. And yet, long before this insurmountable tragedy, Haitians have lived in squalor and hopelessness. As I see the money tallies mount into the millions and millions and surely billions before it's over, I can't help but wonder where all of this money was before the earthquake. Providing a stable infrastructure years ago would have surely alleviated the magnitude of this disaster.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:43 pm |
  132. fernande allonce

    I just want to say thank you to cnn and the American people, what a great nation, Haiti will be forever grateful to you. A special thanks to wolff.(situation room). We would like to know if we can get any help for Haitian
    professionals(doctors and nurses) to travel to Haiti as soon as possible.
    Fa

    January 15, 2010 at 5:43 pm |
  133. Julie Donnelly

    Technology can bring us quicker together to mobilize. I don't have to leave my chair to text in a donation. I am more apt to donate when I feel the most emotional and not later when I have time to decompress. The images with all the technology come faster. All this said, I picked up the telephone and called Red Cross and waited for a human voice. I almost needed a human voice on the other side; the shocking pictures were so upsetting. I cried on the phone.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:44 pm |
  134. Elie Lapointe

    Mister Cafferty
    thank you very for all you are doing broadcasting accurate news about my country haiti.
    Im a musician well known in the haitian community .Since day one i've been using Facebook to help out families reach out to their loved ones .I was able to do that because of the fair amount of friends and fans i have that were in haiti at the time of the earthquake.I am going down in few weeks with back up medicines that me my friends in the states were able to collect from all over ..So technology plays a key role right now in whats going on home ..I blessed the name of GOD for all of you ..Thank you

    January 15, 2010 at 5:44 pm |
  135. Patty

    I really believe technology has helped. I'm 50 years old and have never donated using text or the web. Our family suffered loss from Katrina, I'm glad to send what I can to help and if it wasn't for technology I may have not sent anything at all.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:45 pm |
  136. Dale

    Las Cruces, NM
    Jack, thanks for being connected.

    As a 77-year-old retired Unitarian minister why does "god" he/she//it pick on some of the most impoverished people or countries in the world:: Haiti, Pakistan, Indonesia? It's because with all the technology we have the phone never rings out in the great and awesome beyond. On spaceship earth we're connected with one another. Helping one another is the only absolute I know of . Pick up your phone, donate to a legit charity, and be thankful we're still alive on this beautiful and often dangerous planet.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:46 pm |
  137. Shirley

    Yes, technolgy is a great help, and thanks to CNN we, the people in the USA, and the World are better informed.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:46 pm |
  138. Abe

    Technology is great, if you can afford it. Too bad we hadn't shared some of our earthquake proof building technology with Haiti a few decades ago instead of cutting them off from foreign aid for years because the people of Haiti elected a president who did not cow tow to the Neo-liberal philosophy of the US.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:46 pm |
  139. Stephanie

    Jack,

    As soon as I heard I could donate $10 by texting HAITI to 90999 I did it instantly! It goes to show how all of us can come together and have such a big imapct in such unfortunate times of need. Over 8 million dollars from a few clicks of everyone's cell phone.

    Stephanie – Buffalo, New York

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  140. Kirk

    Technology makes it much easier for me to waste time when I should be doing paperwork...like right now.

    It has also allowed news to travel faster, people to get in touch with loved ones quickly, and aid to be donated more easily.

    It has also allowed anyone (even me!) to get their "two cents" in; which is both good and bad.

    Kirk in the State of Jefferson

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  141. Annette Jalsevac

    Most new electronic technologies are initially criticized by those who fear that their kids might stop reading books, spend less time exercising, dull their minds and so on.

    Once we've determined that a technology is here to stay, instead of trying to prevent our kids from any contact with the device or technology, parents should help their kids develop good user habits just as we've had to learn to do with the radio, the television and the phone. This disaster in Haiti is demonstrating how the newer technologies are enabling the real experts (our kids) to get socially involved in a positive way. Thanks to digital advnaces the world has indeed become a smaller place; teenagers in the wealthy countries of the U.S. and Canada whom we complain are too often glued to their cell phones, can develop empathy for suffering people in another country and act on this empathy by feeling a "virtual" connection and by obtaining instant information. The large amount of donations being contributed via texting doesn't surprise me at all. Technology in and of itself is neither good nor bad; the way it is used is what gives technology it's value.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  142. Ron Richard

    The port is damaged. The airport has no taxiway. Where are the Seabees? They would have had both these problems resolved by now. Put the disaster in the hands of the military and get it OUT of the Washington Bureaucracy. Washington couldn’t handle a broken dinner plate, let alone an earthquake-ravaged country.
    RonR
    Winthrop HArbor, IL

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  143. Terry Gnsbg,IN

    John W. January 15th, 2010 3:14 pm ET

    Jack,

    I hear a lot of excuses about why aid is slow in reaching Haiti. Has anyone thought about dropping in supplies by parachute? I know it's rough terrain, but it's an alternative to watching people die on live TV.

    John W.
    Lake Placid, FL
    ditto

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  144. jim maloney

    I really dont feel that modern technology has helped with this crisis in Hati. I have followed this from the begining and all the great reporters from CNN and dont understand how they can get to all the bad sites but its 3 days and not any aid workers in site!! You would think with everything at our fingertips there would have been aid workers alot sooner!! Modern technology is geting in the way but i did text my 10.00 donation and im sure that money has been spent already!! CNNs coverage is the best of all the networks and god bless them all!!!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  145. Flyingwolf, Manchester NH

    I'm going on 61 and this was the first time I texted something to something else to donate money for a cause. That has to count for something.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:47 pm |
  146. Paula

    This new technology opens things up to everyone. It helps people keep in touch for sure. I plan to donate.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:48 pm |
  147. JFranklin

    Why doesn't our Government send Haiti some of the FEMA coffins I see stacked up around the country? The way they are treating the dead is horrible.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:49 pm |
  148. xeejourney

    Technology, like any other tool, is only as good as the hands that are operating it. It's so great to see it used for such worthy purposes.

    As a missionary, I use text-giving technology to raise support for the work I do. I'm struggling to understand something though. The lag-time for text-giving is about 90 days. That means that when someone texts a donation on day 1, it will be up to day 30 before they are billed (the donation is a fee added to the user's phone bill). Then they have 30 days to respond to the bill with payment. Then it can take up to about 30 days for the cell carrier to process the donation and mail a check to the ultimate recipient of the donation.

    My best thinking leads me to believe that a large relief organization like the Red Cross benefits from text-giving to the extent that the "pledges" made serve to free up existing funds to be used immediately. They know most of the money sent through text-giving is coming, so they go ahead and use funds already in their account to provide immediate relief.

    If there's a lesson in this, it's that we should probably focus on text-giving to established organizations who have funds ready to deploy. Giving to a smaller organization who have to wait 90 days to act isn't going to help people today, right?

    If someone knows of a scenario where text-giving provides immediate funds, please respond to this comment for everyone's benefit.

    Prayers for our friends and families in Haiti. We are with you. Stay hopeful.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:49 pm |
  149. Barbara

    Tech makes all the difference! While I was glued to the TV watching the news about Haiti, I was able to pick up my cell and dial "90999" and donate money instantly. I didn't have to go to my computer, find Red Cross website, enter my credit card....blah...blah...blah

    January 15, 2010 at 5:49 pm |
  150. Edwina Marshall

    Jack..
    I'm retired and I love technology!! I'm learning something new everyday and yes I'll be texting in donations!!

    I found out about the Haitian tragedy on Facebook.

    I don't watch news (including CNN) because the coverage is based on opinions of those reporting. I'm not interested in opinions. I'm done with that !!! Enough already!!!

    I truly appreciate the coverage that CNN is providing.You are doing an exceptional and outstanding job.
    Coverage on this makes you #1 with me. I am absolutely surprised and stunned at the time NOT spent on this important issue by other networks.

    Lives/information are dependent on communication provided with technology. I say YES to technology!!!!

    Thanks again CNN you have risen to the occasion by providing news the needed.

    Just the facts and info..Just the facts and info!!
    Thanks so much!!!

    January 15, 2010 at 5:51 pm |
  151. Dick from Indiana

    I think a better question might be why didn't the traditional media get out their cell phones and broadcast. Why doesn't the traditional media have a facebook or twitter account. And why are there only two questions on Friday.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:52 pm |
  152. Jay

    Jack:
    The Technology is threre, but not quite what I should be. Last night instead ordering my "weekly" ritual comfortfood, I thought I donate it the reflief. I though I could just log-on to my bank, make a key stroke and it would be done. However it was not that easy and I became frustrated and mad. I thought it had to be easier than that. I therefore securred the Domain Names DISASTERRELIEFFORDUMMIES and DISASTERRELIEFMADEEASY. Maybe some of your viewers that are out there that can help me set this up, as I am not one that is comfortable givinhg out credit card info.
    Thanks Jack and CNN for the great job you are doing.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:52 pm |
  153. Chuck - Newark, Delaware

    Texting a donation is certainly easy. Obtaining a credit card for my 24YO daughter, even though she has a good job and no debt, is what's difficult, but then again banks have never impressed me as being technological as I'd like them to be...

    January 15, 2010 at 5:53 pm |
  154. Haiti Relief Effort

    I am not sure how to use your blog, Jack. But I hope you can read it somehow. What I want is to point out that the rescue effort is too disorganized and slow. As I see it, after thousand years of studying the earthquake, the USA should do much better. As the U.S. obviously can't I would suggest the following:
    That the world (U.N.?) create a super rapid rescue response team deployable, like a SWAT team within hours, equipped with at least hundred heavy lift helipcopters to drop off medical supplies, water and food at pre-established and posted on the Internet locations, and to lift heavy beams from many places at the same time. Smaller choppers could ferry the wounded to the nearest hospitals and drop supplies in more remote locations.
    The United States could help, but not to coordinate the securing of airports and ports. Best regards. George Szejner.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:54 pm |
  155. Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

    Change always has to be enabled. And your question, Jack, is spot on. Technology is changing the consciousness of the world and you, Anderson, Wolfe, Twitter, social media – texting, tweeting, blogging, communities, your blog... – is changing how we think, how we feel, how we communicate and our ability to do the right thing.

    In in most part, because we can be in communication, via technology, and get the information need, faster and to the right people. The pony express is now operating at the speed of a tweet.

    While not everyone uses technology for the good, if everyone did it would be a much different world. What Haiti is teaching us is that the world can change. As we watch you, Anderson, Wolfe, we get a heart wrenching view into Haiti – and we are reminded of how forutnate we are.

    Not all situations are this severe... but whether it is Haiti or United Breaks Guitars, social media is the catalyst for change. Technology is creating the drive for more conscious cultures, for people to step up and do the right thing, for companies to treat their customers, their employees well.

    Perhaps if social media had been as developed in 2008, the insurance, real estate and banking industries might not have been able to get away with the horrible (illegal?) ways of doing business, of lying to customers, to shareholders, of doing things that are unmentionable... would our country be in the state it is in?

    Social media allows customers, employees - people everywhere to tell the truth, to make companies do the right thing... the erosion of trust by bad behaviors of companies and the exposure of that - and customer's expressing their disdain to not just a few people, but millions - this change, enabled by technology, has put us on the tip of the iceberg... of a global change.

    And it is none too soon. Whether it is Haiti or United or AIG...
    Technology is driving a change in conscious.

    Dr. Natalie Petouhoff, Los Angeles, CA
    @drnatalie

    January 15, 2010 at 5:54 pm |
  156. Beverly Watson

    I was also thtrilled to know I could send a donation via my cellphone by txting, and I did it. After doing so I thought I wonder if my cellphone carrier was going to charge me a fee, and so I called them. What I was told suprised me because what I did was called premium txting, which open my cellphone to other charable txt messages at a fee of $5.00 a month for which I didn't subscribe to. It can be automatic once you use those numbers. My cellphone company told me how to opt out so I would not be charged. What a shame you try to do a good deed, and their is still someone else out there trying to make a buck on your good deed. In other words check b/4 you do. You may be better of just sending the organization you are trying to donate to a check. At least that way you know that organization is the only one who will profit from your donation.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:55 pm |
  157. Michael Noonan

    One question I keep wondering about is the adverse impact of the journalists & production crews on the limited food & water which should be prioritized to the locals and disaster relief workers.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:56 pm |
  158. A. Smith, Oregon

    Does the Haitian people look like any of them actually received the $208 BILLION taxpayer dollars in economic relief a mere 3 years ago from the infamous Bush-Cheney administration? HELL NO!

    Where is the indignation and utter lack of accountability on the Bush-Cheney administration that is on record of giving $208 Billion taxpayer dollars to the Haitian people!

    There is no stockpile of emergency medical supplys, there is no stockpile of emergency medicine. It entirely appears that Bush-Cheney gave $208 BILLION US taxpayer dollars to a handful of Bush jr's. friends in Haiti.

    The Obama Administration should demand accountability for that large amount of taxpayer dollars given a mere 3 years ago that is entirely missing in Haiti at this time of great need.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:57 pm |
  159. VJC

    Simplicity.... To be able to send a text message and donate $10 has tapped into a whole different generation.... Its is a fantastic idea and obviously has worked.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:58 pm |
  160. Shirl in OK

    Jack, you've got to be kidding, but then why not.
    One corrupt government might work very well with another...at least they'll both be on the same brain wave.
    The Haitians can feel quite secure with the United States in charge. Look at how the US government heads up Social Security and Medicare..help is on the way Haiti if you're sure you want it.

    January 15, 2010 at 5:58 pm |
  161. Solmarie Wright

    When the earthquake hit, technology was the first to respond, to let the world see the devastation, the unthinkable happen to the people of Haiti. It has given the people of the world the ability to make things happen, and to capture the moments of a country in need. Without the technology we have today, the money would have not been raised via text message. Technology has helped spread the word faster. It has helped us relive the moment with Haiti. The images, the footage...Technology has give us the ability to keep in contact, and to report when electricity is out. It is a blessing if used in a positive manner

    January 15, 2010 at 5:58 pm |