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November 24th, 2009
06:00 PM ET

Any reason not to impeach S.C. Gov. Sanford?

Is there any reason not to impeach South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford?

Is there any reason not to impeach South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

It's about time. South Carolina legislators are finally debating whether to recommend impeachment of Gov. Mark Sanford.

A resolution says Sanford engaged in "serious misconduct" that amounts to a "dereliction of his duties." It argues that his actions brought "extreme dishonor and shame" to the governor's office and caused South Carolina to suffer ridicule. So what's to debate?

This all goes back to Sanford's disappearance this summer to visit his mistress in Argentina. The governor lied to his staff about his whereabouts telling them he was hiking the Appalachian Trail - on nude hiker's day.

This impeachment debate is only focused on the idea that Sanford was derelict in his duties as governor. But it comes one day after the state ethics commission charged Sanford with 37 counts of violating ethics laws in South Carolina.

Among other things, Sanford is accused of using taxpayer money for high-priced airplane tickets to travel around the world - and to Argentina. Think he's guilty? While the investigation was going on, Sanford set about amending his ethics disclosure documents to reflect the air travel.

In addition to the 37 civil charges, the state attorney general is deciding if there should be criminal charges. What's to debate?

Sanford's lawyers insist the governor hasn't done anything that rises to the level of impeachment. Apparently it's okay to lie about where you're going and steal taxpayer money for personal airplane travel.

Here’s my question to you: Is there any reason not to impeach South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?
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Filed under: Mark Sanford
November 24th, 2009
05:00 PM ET

How will your Christmas spending be different this year?

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How will your Christmas spending be different this year? (PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

With Black Friday right around the corner - retailers are hoping for a better Christmas shopping season than last year.

And there are some glimmers of hope:

One survey shows Black Friday shopping is expected to pick up more than 16 percent. The National Retail Federation says 57 million people say they'll definitely head to the stores this year - that's up from 49 million last year.

Some stores even plan to extend hours on Friday so people have more time to get in on the "door-buster" deals.

A new Gallup Poll shows consumer spending is up 11 percent from the prior week... Even more impressive is the comparison to the same week last year. Spending is down 7 percent–that's the smallest year-to-year decline so far in 2009.

That's something when you consider consumer spending makes up two-thirds of the U.S. economy.

There is also a big difference in how people say they plan to pay for their Christmas shopping this year. The same retail group reports an increase in the number of consumers who say they plan to use cash, debit or check cards. Credit card use is expected to drop by 10 percent.

The reasons include credit card companies reducing consumer’s credit lines and customers’ trying to lower their own debt as the recession drags on.

Here’s my question to you: How will your Christmas spending be different this year?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?
FULL POST


Filed under: Economy • Spending
November 24th, 2009
04:00 PM ET

Do you want govt. more involved in health care?

Do you really want the federal government more involved in health care?

Do you really want the federal government more involved in health care?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

With more Americans now saying that health care is not the government's responsibility, it's not difficult to see why some may feel that way.

All you have to do is look at the track record of government-run programs.

Here we go:

-Social Security was created in 1935. It will be paying out more money than it receives by 2016. And unless changes are made, it will be gone in 2037.

-The Medicare and Medicaid programs were signed into law in 1965. Medicare will run completely out of money by 2017. The situation for Medicaid is even worse.

-Spending on Social Security and Medicare totaled more than $1 trillion last year - or more than one-third of the federal budget.

-The U.S. Postal Service was created in 1775. It’s broke. It posted a $3.8 billion loss for this year. That's $1 billion more than it lost in 2008 - despite $6 billion in cost-cutting moves in the past year.

-How about Fannie Mae, in operation since 1938; and Freddie Mac, established in 1970? Both broke. The two home loan agencies were seized by federal regulators 14 months ago. Fannie Mae is now asking the government for another $15 billion, which would bring the tab for rescuing both companies to about $111 billion.

-And don't forget the hundreds of billions of dollars in the first round of TARP money that went virtually unaccounted for.

And now the government wants about another trillion dollars to reform health care. A trillion dollars we don't have.

Here’s my question to you: Do you really want the federal government more involved in health care?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?
FULL POST


Filed under: Health care