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October 30th, 2008
05:00 PM ET

Which VP has the greater risk of slipping up?

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Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say. (PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

A lot's been made of Republican Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin going off-script and off-message over the past couple of weeks. Some of John McCain's aides aren't too pleased with some of the things coming out of her mouth. They say she's gone "rogue." she's been called a "diva." her supporters - and she has many– say it's just Sarah Palin, being Sarah Palin.

On the Democratic side, you're not seeing too much of Joe Biden being Joe Biden during these final days. In fact, Barack Obama's normally chatty running mate - known for some serious gaffes himself when unscripted - has been conspicuously quiet these past couple of weeks. Suddenly Biden, who will normally consent to an interview at the drop of a hat, has not made himself readily available to the media. As Time magazine's Karen Tumulty, who's been traveling with Biden, put it, at times he's like "a politician packaged in shrink-wrap."

Watch: Cafferty: VP pick could slip

And that's probably got a lot to do with remarks he made at a Seattle fund-raiser a couple of weeks ago when he said Barack Obama would be tested by an international crisis soon after being elected. Obama's public response was, quote "I think that Joe sometimes engages in rhetorical flourishes." But perhaps there was a private response too... And that's why these days there's "No Joe."

Here’s my question to you: In the closing days, who is the greater risk for saying something harmful: Joe Biden or Sarah Palin?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Gov. Sarah Palin • Sen. Joe Biden
October 30th, 2008
04:59 PM ET

How can McCain win undecided voters

How can McCain win undecided voters?

How can McCain win undecided voters?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Less than 140 hours until election day when Americans will rush to the polls in what is expected to be record numbers to decide the direction of their country for the next four years.

Never has more money been spent by candidates for president to try to convince you they are the answer to America's problems. And yet after almost two years of campaigning, it is estimated that somewhere around seven percent of Americans still have not decided whether they want John McCain or Barack Obama to run things.

The differences between the two men are as pronounced as between any two candidates for the nation's highest office in a very long time. Whether he admits it or not, John McCain carries the mantle of President George W. Bush with him–seen as a continuation of the policies that have led to record low approval ratings for our current president. Americans are simply not happy with the way things are going. Yet McCain remains competitive.

Barack Obama is seen by many as a transformational figure who offers the country a chance to break with the past. His early campaign theme of change took hold with many of those Americans who are dissatisfied.

It would seem that if John McCain has any realistic chance of winning next Tuesday, he must somehow attract a large percentage of those voters who have yet to make up their mind.

Here’s my question to you: In the final few days, what can John McCain do to win over undecided voters?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: 2008 Election • John McCain
October 30th, 2008
02:06 PM ET

How close is the White House race to being over?

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This CNN Electoral Map shows Barack Obama's lead, if the Election was held today. (PHOTO CREDIT: CNN.COM)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

The signs are increasingly ominous that John McCain's dream of being president is just about over. In one battleground state after another, Barack Obama's lead continues to grow. CNN's electoral map has been adjusted to suggest that if the election were held today, Barack Obama would get 291 electoral votes - it takes 270 to win - while John McCain would get just 163 - leaving 84 electoral votes up for grabs.

Barack Obama holds substantial leads in Pennsylvania, Nevada, Colorado and Virginia… all red states won by President Bush in 2004.

Obama also leads in Florida and North Carolina .

The Associated Press quotes GOP consultant Tom Rath in New Hampshire where McCain trails by double digits as saying the race is all but over, quote, "I get the sense it's shutting down," unquote.

AP also cites a senior GOP aide in Congress speaking on condition of anonymity as saying McCain advisers are now being asked by some Republican leaders to focus McCain's travel on states with close senate races… essentially abandoning his White House ambitions to help re-elect GOP Senators.

Here’s my question to you: How close is the White House race to being over?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: 2008 Election • Barack Obama • John McCain