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April 30th, 2008
05:20 PM ET

Save fuel by working less?

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A woman holds a sign during a protest against high fuel price with other truck drivers April 28, 2008 in Washington, DC. (PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

44% of Americans in a recent survey said paying for gasoline was a serious problem for them. Gasoline costs were the most frequently cited economic concern across all income levels. 25% of people who make more than $75,000 per year said it's a serious problem while a whopping 63% of folks who earn less than $30,000 feel that way.

The cost of gasoline far outranks the number two economic concern, getting a good paying job or a raise at 29% and paying for healthcare and health insurance at 28%. The survey was conducted on behalf of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

And all indications are it's going to get worse before it gets better. As gasoline shoots past $4 per gallon in some parts of the country, the president of OPEC is predicting crude oil prices could hit $200 per barrel. A year ago average gas prices were less than $3 per gallon according to AAA.

One idea being tossed around as a way of dealing with this is the four-day workweek. Several states are considering it. Staggered work schedules would be necessary in order to keep government offices open five days a week, and some have suggested that would end up costing the taxpayers more money. It's also an idea that may gain traction in the private sector. I, for one, think it's a terrific idea.

Here’s my question to you: Would shifting to a four-day workweek be a good way to save fuel?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Oil Prices • US Economy
April 30th, 2008
04:55 PM ET

Are you optimistic about the future of healthcare?

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Nisha Rajan, cringes slightly while Kyle Holloway, a University of New Mexico pharmacy student, gives her a flu shot in Santa Fe, N.M. Click the Play Button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say.  (PHOTO CREDIT: AP)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

It's no secret that the health care system in this country is a mess. Right now, there are almost 50 million people who have no health insurance at all and the costs of health care keep rising. A new study out this week even showed that 7% of Americans were willing to get married just so they could get their spouse's health care benefits.

Now, on the campaign trail, each of the three presidential candidates is telling us that his or her plan offers the best solution to the problem.

Both Democratic candidates want to move toward universal health care coverage. Hillary Clinton, who tried to tackle health care in 1992 and failed, is proposing an individual mandate requiring all Americans to sign up for health insurance. Obama doesn't go quite that far, but his plan requires coverage for all children. Both Democrats' plans build on the current employer-based system and impose new regulations on insurers. The Republican, John McCain, says these ideas are "inefficient" and "irrational." He is opposed to mandates and direct regulation. Instead, he favors using tax credits to draw workers away from company health plans. He says that would allow people to find cheaper insurance on their own, more tailored to their individual needs. This proposal was similar to one proposed by President Bush last year which flopped in Congress, failing to get even a committee hearing.

One other item not being talked about by any of the candidates is this: The current government health care plan, Medicare, represents tens of trillions of dollars in unfunded liability.

Here’s my question to you: How optimistic are you about the future of our health care system?
Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: US Healthcare
April 30th, 2008
01:36 PM ET

Has Rev. Wright swayed the superdelegates?

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FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Ever since Super Tuesday, Barack Obama has been outscoring Hillary Clinton big time when it comes to picking up support from the superdelegates. The Wall Street Journal suggests he's close to taking the lead, and that if he doesn't stumble badly in Indiana or North Carolina next week enough of them will break his way after June third to give him the nomination.

Seems simple enough. He leads in pledged delegates and she can't catch him there. He's won more states, has more popular votes, is a much better fund-raiser - very important consideration - and has shown he can appeal to Independents and Republicans. Piece of cake. Just run out the clock and get ready for McCain.

Yesterday on this program former President Carter, who is a superdelegate, was asked if he would support the candidate he voted for in the Georgia primary. His answer was, "Yes, unless I change my mind."

And therein lies the problem for Barack Obama. Superdelegates are free to change their minds. And thanks to the angry tirades of a bitter old man who seems less like a pastor and more like a racist with each passing day, Obama could have a serious problem.

Here’s my question to you: Will Rev. Jeremiah Wright cause Democratic superdelegates to rethink their support of Barack Obama?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Barack Obama • Hillary Clinton