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February 28th, 2008
06:20 PM ET

Does it matter that McCain was born outside the U.S.?

 Sen. John McCain, talks to media in Houston, Texas.

Sen. John McCain, talks to media in Houston, Texas.

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Here's something you may not know about John McCain: He was born in the Panama Canal Zone in 1936. His father was stationed there in the Navy.

The New York Times reports the circumstances surrounding McCain's birth raise questions about his ability to become president since our founding fathers specifically said only a "natural-born citizen" can hold the highest office in the land. The idea was to prevent foreigners from becoming president.

There's no precedent for McCain. No U.S. president has ever been born outside the 50 states. But, McCain's campaign says they're confident he meets the requirement, that they researched the question during his last run in 2000 and this time around as well. And they have asked former solicitor general Theodore Olson to prepare a legal opinion.

McCain supporter Senator Lindsey Graham says it would be incomprehensible if the son of a military officer born on a military installation couldn't run for president. He says it would mean telling every military family their child couldn't become president if born overseas.

There's been lots of internet buzz about the topic in recent months. Some insist McCain is ineligible. According to lawyers who have studied this stuff, there's confusion not just over the provision itself, but also over who would have the legal authority to challenge a candidate on such a point.

Here’s my question to you: John McCain was born outside the U.S. Should that affect his ability to be president?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: John McCain
February 28th, 2008
06:00 PM ET

$$$ worries for retirement?

ALT TEXT
(PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

What's happening to the American dream? Among other things, a lot of Americans are worried they won't have enough money for their retirement years.

A new Gallup poll shows 47% of those surveyed are concerned about outliving their money after they retire. That number jumps to 53% when it comes to those between the ages of 30 and 64.

It's no secret that a lot of Americans are feeling a financial squeeze in today's uncertain economy. For many, this means they've decided to delay their retirement. This poll found 45% say they fear they'll have to retire at a later age than they originally planned; this is a big concern especially among younger people.

Rising costs of everything from food to energy, health care and tuition have a lot of people worried they won't be able to pay their bills. 44% worry they won't be able to afford college tuition for a child or another family member. 26% have doubts about paying off college debts, and 33% are concerned that they won't be able to pay medical or health care costs in the next year. When it comes to people's biggest asset, their home, 43% are afraid it will lose value in the next year.

It didn't used to be this way. And yet President Bush insisted today we're not headed for a recession.

Here’s my question to you: How concerned are you that you’ll have enough money when you retire?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Uncategorized
February 28th, 2008
05:59 PM ET

Full disclosure from Clinton?

 Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say.

Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say.

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

There's a lot of information voters still don't have about Hillary Clinton, including the White House records from when she was first lady along with her tax returns.

When asked at this week's debate about the White House records, Clinton said she would "absolutely" release the documents to show the public what she did and who she met with over the course of those 8 years. She said she's quote "urged the process be as quick as possible."

Well, the Bush administration now says it's actually the Clintons who have been holding up the release of those records. They say former President Bill Clinton's representative hasn't made any move yet to release over 11-thousand pages of records. The Clinton campaign says it may take two more weeks for that representative to decide what to release and then to request the release of the documents from the White House. How convenient – that would be after next Tuesday when Texas and Ohio hold their primaries.

As for the tax returns, Hillary Clinton also said at the debate she would release them once she becomes the nominee "or even earlier."

But her campaign seems to be backing away from that statement now, suggesting Clinton won't release the financial information until tax time in April. When Clinton loaned her own campaign $5 million, Barack Obama suggested she should follow his lead and release her tax returns so the public could see where the money came from.

Here’s my question to you: How important is it for Hillary Clinton to release her tax returns and White House records now?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Tax Returns