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February 27th, 2008
06:51 PM ET

News media unfair to Clinton?

 Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say.

Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say.

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

It seems like Hillary Clinton is not only running against Barack Obama these days, she's also running against the news media.

Early on in last night's debate, Clinton referenced a "Saturday Night Live" skit that showed reporters fawning over Obama and showering him with softball questions. She said, "Maybe we should ask Barack if he's comfortable and needs another pillow." Clinton also whined about getting asked the first question more often in the last several debates.

The Clinton campaign has been complaining recently – more so since she has fallen behind – that the news media is tougher on her than Obama. It's a tactic as old as politics: things aren't going well, blame the media.

In today's column in The New York Times, Maureen Dowd questions Clinton's line of attack against the media.

She writes: "Beating on the press is the lamest thing you can do. It is only because of the utter open-mindedness of the press that Hillary can lose 11 contests in a row and still be treated as a contender."

She has a point. If Barack Obama had lost the last 11 races in a row since Super Tuesday, we wouldn't even remember his name.

Here’s my question to you: Have the news media been unfair to Hillary Clinton?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Hillary Clinton • News Media
February 27th, 2008
05:56 PM ET

Changing your mind on Clinton or Obama?

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Let's take inventory of where things stand in the Democratic race for the White House: The campaign is 13 months old, there have been 20 debates and 40 primaries and caucuses. But Texas and Ohio – along with Vermont and Rhode Island – could seal the deal next week in terms of making it impractical for Hillary Clinton to go on.

On the other hand, if Clinton pulls a rabbit out of the hat, and manages to win those states with 65% of votes, all bets are off and she's back in it. With Pennsylvania and the superdelegates still out there, she might still be able to pull it off.

When it comes down to it, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are very similar on many of the issues. They have minor differences on health care plans and their ideas on how to restart the economy.

Their major difference is on the war in Iraq. Obama opposed the war from the beginning while Clinton voted to authorize it. And during last night's debate, Obama landed one of the best punches of night when, referring to Hillary's vote to authorize the war, he said: "Once we had driven the bus into the ditch, there were only so many ways we could get out. The question is: Who's making the decision initially to drive the bus into the ditch?"

Here’s my question to you: What would it take to change your mind about Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: 2008 Election • Hillary Clinton
February 27th, 2008
05:01 PM ET

How would $4/gallon gas affect you?

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(PHOTO CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES)

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

$4 a gallon, and maybe more, is the dire prediction for gasoline prices by this spring.

Gas prices have lagged behind oil prices for months, but it looks like they could soon be catching up. The price of crude oil spiked above $102 a barrel today for the first time ever and diesel prices continue to hit record highs on a daily basis.

One Harvard economist tells the New York Times, "The effect of high oil prices today could be the difference between having a recession and not having a recession." It's clear that higher gas and oil prices are just the latest bad news for our economy which is being buffeted by the housing collapse, the credit crisis, rising inflation and a weakening dollar.

If people are forced to spend more on energy costs, it follows they will have less money to spend on other things. Economists say that in December, Americans were spending more than 6% of their disposable income on energy. That's the highest level since 1985.

Regular unleaded gasoline costs an average of $3.15 a gallon today; that's up from about $2.35 a year ago. It also represents a jump of 20 cents gallon in just the last two weeks. And prices are expected to accelerate from here.

Here’s my question to you: How would gas prices of $4 a gallon or higher affect your life?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Rising Gas Prices