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February 1st, 2008
06:01 PM ET

Super Bowl vs. Super Tuesday?

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning.

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning.
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

We're headed into a week of "super-sized" events. First up on Sunday is the Super Bowl, where the undefeated New England Patriots go head-to-head with the New York Giants. And two days later, it's Super Tuesday. Voters in more than 20 states will go to the polls, perhaps finalizing their party's presidential nominees.

So which event are Americans more pumped up about? Turns out, it's almost a toss-up. A new Washington Post/ABC News poll shows 40% of those surveyed say they're more excited for the big football game, while 37% say they're more worked up about the Super Tuesday primaries.

The poll also found those who are more psyched for the Super Bowl include: football fans – no surprise there, those who haven't gone beyond high school, men and Independents.

As far as people who are more excited about Super Tuesday, that would include: non-football fans, college graduates, women and Democrats. When it comes to Republicans, they divide about evenly between the two events.

Here’s my question to you: Are you more excited for the Super Bowl or Super Tuesday, and why?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Super Tuesday
February 1st, 2008
06:01 PM ET

How will Clinton-Obama debate affect Super Tuesday?

 Senator Hillary Clinton and Senator Barack Obama at last night's final Democratic debate before Super Tuesday.

Senator Hillary Clinton and Senator Barack Obama at last night's final Democratic debate before Super Tuesday.

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

Last night's debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama was a surprise. It was pleasant to watch. They were cordial and polite to each other. The discussions were about real issues such as health care and Iraq, and they were conducted by two adults who didn't resort to hackneyed clichés and tired, old campaign slogans.

I actually learned something. I suspect a lot of other Americans did, too. Gone were the insults, innuendoes and accusations that have marked previous meetings between these two. And the fact that there was just the two of them allowed the audience to focus in and not be distracted by seven different answers to the same question from people who have no more chance of being the next president than I do.

If the tone of last night's debate could somehow be transferred to Washington – replacing the bitter partisanship and gridlock that are currently destroying the country – the possibilities would suddenly seem limitless.

And, at the end of the night, Hillary won. She was smoother, more confident and more in command of the facts. Obama was good, but she was better. Assuming the audience was as large as I think it was, she did herself a lot of good last night.

Here’s my question to you: How important will last night's debate prove to be on Super Tuesday?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: Barack Obama • Hillary Clinton
February 1st, 2008
05:04 PM ET

John McCain changes his tune on taxes?

Senator John McCain participates in the televised Republican debate at the Reagan Library.  Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say

Senator John McCain participates in the televised Republican debate at the Reagan Library. Click the play button to see what Jack and our viewers had to say

FROM CNN's Jack Cafferty:

When it comes to the Bush tax cuts, John McCain has a pretty complicated story. See if you can follow along:

It starts with being against them before he was for them. At this week's debate, McCain said he opposed the tax cuts in the past because they didn't come with spending cuts. But that's not what he said at the time.

In 2001, McCain said President Bush's $1.35 trillion tax cut benefited the wealthy at the expense of the middle class. At the time, he tried but failed to change the bill to reduce income tax cuts for the wealthiest and give greater benefits to those earning less money. Not a word about spending cuts.

In 2003, McCain opposed a $350 billion tax cut. In that instance, he said it was because there should be no tax cuts while the cost of the Iraq war and its aftermath were still unknown.

Flash forward to the 2008 presidential race. Not only is McCain giving a different reason for his previous opposition to tax relief, but he now wants to make the Bush tax cuts permanent, fighting what he calls "the Democrats' plans for a crippling tax increase." This is from the man who calls his campaign bus "The Straight Talk Express."

Of course, it's not too hard to figure out why he's suddenly for the cuts now: McCain's opposition to the Bush tax cuts is one of the many reasons why he's come under such harsh criticism from many in the conservative base.

Here’s my question to you: Why would John McCain misrepresent his own record when it comes to the Bush tax cuts?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

FULL POST


Filed under: John McCain • Taxes